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Author: Keith, Kristen K.
Resulting in 7 citations.
1. Keith, Kristen K.
Reputation, Voluntary Mobility and Wages
Review of Economics and Statistics 75,3 (August 1993): 559-563.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2109476
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Endogeneity; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Labor Turnover; Layoffs; Mobility; Mobility, Occupational; Quits; Unemployment; Wage Differentials; Wage Levels

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Many studies have examined the impact of turnover on wages, but little empirical work has examined whether past mobility behavior affects current wage offers. The effect of voluntary mobility on subsequent wages is analyzed to discover if there are wage penalties associated with repeated mobility. To reduce the endogeneity between wages and voluntary mobility, the sample is restricted to young males on their first job following a permanent layoff. Using respondents from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, ordinary least squares wage equations from the layoff sample are compared to those from a sample of workers who remained employed. The evidence shows that voluntary mobility differentially affects the wage equations of the restricted and the unrestricted samples. [ABI/Inform]
Bibliography Citation
Keith, Kristen K. "Reputation, Voluntary Mobility and Wages." Review of Economics and Statistics 75,3 (August 1993): 559-563.
2. Keith, Kristen K.
The Reputational Effect of Job Mobility
Ph.D. Dissertation, The Ohio State University, 1989.
Also: http://etd.ohiolink.edu/send-pdf.cgi/Keith%20Kristen.pdf?osu1265034773&dl=y
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Mobility; Mobility, Job; Quits

Many studies have hypothesized that workers' "reputation" ensures their performance in an implicit employment contract. Poor performance results in loss of reputation which in turn may result in future wealth reduction. This dissertation examines the firm's interest in workers' mobility propensities. Specifically, it addresses the following question: Is there a reputational effect (in the form of wage penalties) of voluntary mobility? Voluntary mobility is measured using the number of an individual's previous quits. Previous quits are disaggregated into two reasons for quitting: economic and personal. The principal analysis is based on OLS regressions of the log of the hourly wage rate of young men employed in 1986. OLS estimates from a restricted sample of workers permanently laid-off recently are compared to those from a sample of workers remaining employed. The "permanent layoff" restriction is used to isolate the reputational effect of mobility from returns to previous job shopping and losses from forfeiting firm-specific training. Personal quit estimates are insignificant in both samples. Economic quit estimates are positive and significant in the unrestricted sample and insignificant in the restricted sample. These results reveal no evidence of a reputation effect of voluntary mobility. Thus, reputation may not play its assumed role in ensuring performance in implicit employment contracts.
Bibliography Citation
Keith, Kristen K. The Reputational Effect of Job Mobility. Ph.D. Dissertation, The Ohio State University, 1989..
3. Keith, Kristen K.
McWilliams, Abagail
Job Mobility and Gender-Based Wage Growth Differentials
Economic Inquiry 35,2 (April 1997): 320-333.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1465-7295.1997.tb01913.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Economic Association International
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Mobility, Job; Mobility, Occupational; Wage Differentials; Wage Growth

Studies of gender differences in the returns to job mobility have yielded conflicting results. The issue of whether there are gender differences in mobility patterns or in the returns to different types of mobility. The results, based on the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, imply that there are gender differences in mobility patterns, but there are not gender differences in the wage growth associated with different types of mobility. Therefore, it appears that empirical estimates of the gender differences in the returns to job mobility may be misleading if they do not consider the cause of separation.
Bibliography Citation
Keith, Kristen K. and Abagail McWilliams. "Job Mobility and Gender-Based Wage Growth Differentials." Economic Inquiry 35,2 (April 1997): 320-333.
4. Keith, Kristen K.
McWilliams, Abagail
Mobility, Job Search, and Wage Growth: Are There Gender Differences?
Preliminary Draft, Arizona State University West, June 1994
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Author
Keyword(s): Behavioral Differences; Childhood Education, Early; Discrimination, Sex; Gender Differences; Job Search; Job Skills; Mobility; Wage Differentials; Wage Gap; Wage Growth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

It is well established that some gender differences exist in employment in the U.S. The most widely researched and discussed is the difference in wages. Men, on average, earn more than women. Additionally, there is evidence that the gap widens over the work life of men and women. There is still a great deal of controversy over the causes of this wage gap. While the evidence on wage differences in both consistent and persistent, we still do not know why this gender difference exists. Explanations of the gender gap usually fall into two broad categories: sexual discrimination and gender differences in behavior. In this paper we add to the explanation of the gender wage gap by extending the research on gender differences in behavior. Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth are used to examine the mobility patterns of young men and women, the effect of different types of mobility on wage growth, the job search propensities of young men and women, the effect of job search on wage growth, and the wage growth of young men and women.
Bibliography Citation
Keith, Kristen K. and Abagail McWilliams. "Mobility, Job Search, and Wage Growth: Are There Gender Differences?" Preliminary Draft, Arizona State University West, June 1994.
5. Keith, Kristen K.
McWilliams, Abagail
The Returns to Mobility and Job Search by Gender
Industrial and Labor Relations Review 52,3 (April 1999): 460-477.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2525145
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Cornell University
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Job Patterns; Job Search; Mobility, Occupational; Wage Growth

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the authors estimate the returns to job search, mobility, and the interaction of search and mobility for young men and women. They find statistically significant gender differences in mobility patterns and search behavior, but not in the returns to a given behavior. Both men and women engaged in substantial job search and mobility early in their careers, which resulted in wage growth premiums. There is evidence of an interactive effect: returns to search were realized through mobility, and returns to mobility were augmented by search. COPYRIGHT: Copyright New York State School of Industrial & Labor Relations 1999.
Bibliography Citation
Keith, Kristen K. and Abagail McWilliams. "The Returns to Mobility and Job Search by Gender." Industrial and Labor Relations Review 52,3 (April 1999): 460-477.
6. Keith, Kristen K.
McWilliams, Abagail
The Wage Effects of Cumulative Job Mobility
Industrial and Labor Relations Review 49,1 (October 1995): 121-137.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2524916
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Cornell University Press
Keyword(s): Industrial Training; Layoffs; Mobility, Job; Quits; Schooling; Skills; Training; Wage Differentials; Wage Effects; Wage Levels

This analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth shows that cumulative job mobility had statistically significant effects on wages in the years 1979-88. The direction of the wage effects (positive or negative) and their magnitude varied depending on the type of cumulative mobility examined: employee-initiated versus employer-initiated separations, economic versus family-related quits, layoffs versus discharges. The results also indicate that although men and women had different mobility histories--men, for example, had been discharged more often than women, and women had quit for family-related reasons more often than men--the wage effects of each type of cumulative mobility (economic quits, family-related quits, layoffs, and discharges) were similar for men and women.
Bibliography Citation
Keith, Kristen K. and Abagail McWilliams. "The Wage Effects of Cumulative Job Mobility." Industrial and Labor Relations Review 49,1 (October 1995): 121-137.
7. Keith, Kristen K.
Williams, Donald R.
A Note on Racial Differences in Employed Male Job Search
Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society 41,3 (July 2002): 422-429.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1468-232X.00254/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Institute of Industrial Relations, University of California, Berkeley
Keyword(s): Job Search; Mobility, Job; Racial Differences; Wage Growth; Wages; Working Conditions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article examines why black males are more likely to engage in employed job search than are their white counterparts. We focus primarily on the roles that expected wages, wage growth, and job characteristics have on explaining the observed differential. Using a sample of young men from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), the results indicate that the greater propensity of blacks to engage in employed job search is the result of their desire to obtain better jobs with more agreeable working conditions. Source: http://www.blackwellpublishers.co.uk/asp/journal.asp?ref=0019-8676. (Copyright: Blackwell Publishers.)
Bibliography Citation
Keith, Kristen K. and Donald R. Williams. "A Note on Racial Differences in Employed Male Job Search." Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society 41,3 (July 2002): 422-429.