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Author: Kauffman-Berry, Andrea
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Kauffman-Berry, Andrea
Examining the Mechanics of Latino Racialization: What Factors Predict How People Racially Classify Self-identified Latinos?
Presented: Philadelphia PA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2018
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Hispanics; Mobility, Economic; Mobility, Social; Racial Studies; Research Methodology

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

How are people who self-identify as Latino racially classified by others? Further, what factors predict how a person will racially classify someone who self-identifies as Latino? This study measures the distribution of racial classifications for a sample of individuals who identify as Latino. It then examines the mechanics of Latino racialization by modeling factors that predict how an individual will be racially classified. Data for this study comes from a longitudinal sample of racial classification events occurring in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 (NLSY97). Results of the multinomial logistic regression with random effects demonstrate that the socioeconomic characteristics of respondents, such as receiving welfare payments or being incarcerated, as well as the characteristics of racial classifiers, such as having a college degree or being born during or after 1964, predict how Latinos are racially classified. these results suggest that upward or downward socioeconomic mobility may influence the way they are racially classified, particularly as white or other. This finding underscores a difficulty in conducting research on the socioeconomic incorporation of Latinos in the U.S. If Latinos who experience upward socioeconomic mobility are more likely to be racially classified as "white" and those who experience downward socioeconomic mobility are more likely to be racially classified as "other", then these racially-defined groups may be changing in ways that obscure the socioeconomic experiences of Latinos in the U.S. By examining the mechanism of racialization for Latinos this study expands on our understanding of race in the U.S.
Bibliography Citation
Kauffman-Berry, Andrea. "Examining the Mechanics of Latino Racialization: What Factors Predict How People Racially Classify Self-identified Latinos?" Presented: Philadelphia PA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2018.
2. Kauffman-Berry, Andrea
How Latino Identity Drives Patterns of Change in Racial Classification Over Time
Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Hispanics; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research examines how interviewers go about racially classifying self-identified Latino respondents. To examine the process by which interviewers decide what racial classification to give each respondent, this research asks four questions. First, what are the odds that a racial classification will change from Time N to Time N+1? Second, how are these odds different depending upon the kind of change in racial classification that occurs? For instance, how are the odds of a change from white to other different from the odds of a change from other to black? Third, what role does Latino self-identification play in this process? How do the odds that a racial classification will change vary for respondents who self-identified as Latino in 1997 compared to those who did not? Fourth, if Latino identity is found to drive patterns of change in racial classification, do these changes in racial classification occur randomly among self-identified Latino respondents or do they occur in predictable ways? Do the odds that a self-identified Latino respondent will experience a change in racial classification differ depending on a series of possible independent variables, such as incarceration, arrest, or completion of a B.A. since the date of the last interview? This research systematically models how these factors may predict changes in racial classification over time using multinomial logistic regression models with respondent fixed effects using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997.
Bibliography Citation
Kauffman-Berry, Andrea. "How Latino Identity Drives Patterns of Change in Racial Classification Over Time." Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016.
3. Kauffman-Berry, Andrea
Racial Fluidity, Skin Tone, and Immigrant Status in the NLSY97
Presented: Chicago IL, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2015
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Immigrants; Racial Studies; Skin Tone

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Building explicitly on the work of Saperstein and Penner (2010, 2012), this study examines changes in racial classification and racial identification at the individual level over time. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, a dataset including a nationally-representative sample of youths between the ages of 12-17 in December of 1996, with data collected annually through 2011, this research asks two questions. First, do interviewer-reported racial classification and self-reported racial identification change at the individual level over time? Second, if racial classification does change at the individual level over time, how can these changes be characterized? To address the first question, this study uses transition matrices to determine rates of "racial migration" between racial classifications at the individual level over time. Preliminary results demonstrate that racial classification does indeed change at the individual level in the NLSY97 sample. This study makes several theoretical contributions to our understanding of processes of racial classification, racial identification, and racial stratification within the U.S. racial system. First, this analysis has implications for two theories about the role of skin tone in the U.S. racial system: Bonilla-Silva’s notion of "pigmentocracy" and the traditional "one drop rule." Further, this study explores the dynamic processes of racial identification and racial classification among immigrants in the NLSY97. With a representative sample of immigrant youths, this research explores if processes of racial classification and racial identification differ among first and second generation immigrants than among the non-immigrant native born.
Bibliography Citation
Kauffman-Berry, Andrea. "Racial Fluidity, Skin Tone, and Immigrant Status in the NLSY97." Presented: Chicago IL, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2015.