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Author: Houser, Linda
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Houser, Linda
Vartanian, Thomas P.
Pay Matters: The Positive Economic Impacts of Paid Family Leave for Families, Businesses and the Public
Report of the Center for Women and Work, School of Management and Labor Relations, Rutgers University, January 2012.
Also: http://smlr.rutgers.edu/paymatters-cwwreport-january2012
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: School of Management and Labor Relations (SMLR), Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Labor Force Participation; Leave, Family or Maternity/Paternity; Maternal Employment; State-Level Data/Policy; Wages; Wages, Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This new study, commissioned by the National Partnership for Women & Families and conducted by the Center for Women and Work at Rutgers University, with funding from the Rockefeller Foundation, uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 to 2009 Panel, and finds that women who take paid leave after a child’s birth report stronger labor force attachment and positive changes in wages in the year following a child’s birth, when compared to those who do not take any leave. Both women and men report lower levels of public assistance receipt in the year following a child’s birth, when compared to those who do not take any leave. These analyses control for other factors that differentiate those with access to and use of paid leave from those with either no leave or access only to unpaid leave. These factors include average wages and hours of work, family income relative to the poverty line, education, health status, marital status, age, and race.
Bibliography Citation
Houser, Linda and Thomas P. Vartanian. "Pay Matters: The Positive Economic Impacts of Paid Family Leave for Families, Businesses and the Public." Report of the Center for Women and Work, School of Management and Labor Relations, Rutgers University, January 2012.
2. Houser, Linda
Vartanian, Thomas P.
Policy Matters: The Relationship Between Public Policy, Paid Family Leave, and Economic Security for U.S. Workers
Presented: San Diego CA, Society for Social Work and Research Annual Conference, January 2013
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Society for Social Work and Research (SSWR)
Keyword(s): Geocoded Data; Leave, Family or Maternity/Paternity; State-Level Data/Policy

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Methods: We analyzed data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 to 2009 Panel—a nationally representative sample of individuals no older than age 30 in 2009—linked to state identifiers. All results were drawn from logistic and linear regression analyses. Our analyses controlled for a variety of individual- and state-level factors. Depending upon the analysis and sample in question, sample sizes ranged from 258 to 1,355.

Results: Women in states with TDI or PFL programs are twice as likely to take paid leave following the birth of a child than are women in other states. The effect is even larger for low-income women—those who are least likely to have access to paid leave through an employer.

Bibliography Citation
Houser, Linda and Thomas P. Vartanian. "Policy Matters: The Relationship Between Public Policy, Paid Family Leave, and Economic Security for U.S. Workers." Presented: San Diego CA, Society for Social Work and Research Annual Conference, January 2013.
3. Houser, Linda
Vartanian, Thomas P.
Norton, Jenifer
Socially Insuring Family Leave: The Relationship Between Public Policy, Paid Family Leave, and Economic Well-Being
Presented: Albuquerque NM, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM)
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Geocoded Data; Leave, Family or Maternity/Paternity; Maternal Employment; State-Level Data/Policy; Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Temporary Disability Insurance (TDI) policies in five states enable women to take short medical leaves in connection with childbirth, and Paid Family Leave (PFL) policies in two states enable men and women to take leave to care for a new child. While we would expect these policies to positively impact new parents’ reports of taking paid leave in connection with the birth of a child, our goal is to estimate the magnitude of such an increase and its impacts on family economic security.

We analyzed data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 to 2009 Panel, a nationally representative sample of individuals no older than age 30 in 2009. All results were drawn from logistic and linear regression analyses, as well as difference in difference models. Our analyses controlled for a variety of individual- and state-level factors. Depending upon the analysis and sample in question, sample sizes ranged from 258 to 1,355.

Bibliography Citation
Houser, Linda, Thomas P. Vartanian and Jenifer Norton. "Socially Insuring Family Leave: The Relationship Between Public Policy, Paid Family Leave, and Economic Well-Being." Presented: Albuquerque NM, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 2014.