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Author: Honeycutt, Todd C.
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Honeycutt, Todd C.
Mann, David R.
Crime and Parenthood: Factors Affecting the Outcomes of Adolescents With and Without Disabilities
Working Paper 37, Mathematica Policy Research, Princeton, NJ, March 2015
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.
Keyword(s): Crime; Disability; Educational Outcomes; Employment; Parenthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

BACKGROUND: Adolescents often engage in behaviors that can detrimentally affect outcomes for the rest of their lives. In addition to avoiding such behaviors, youth with disabilities face other challenges that complicate their transitions into adulthood.

OBJECTIVE: In this analysis, we explore how two risk factors (criminal behavior and parenthood) in adolescence influenced the education and employment outcomes of young adults. We pay special attention to the interaction between disability status and these factors.

METHOD: Using data from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we produce summary statistics and estimate several regression models; examining respondent outcomes at age 24.

RESULTS: Despite increased prevalence among youth with disabilities, parenthood and crime did not appear to affect education or employment outcomes any more than these factors affected the outcomes of youth without disabilities.

CONCLUSION: Multiple risk factors are intertwined and are associated with poorer outcomes, which suggest the need for better identification issues and supports in secondary school. The issue of higher prevalence of dropping out of high school and having certain risk factors might reflect the lower cognitive ability of youth with mental limitations, but environmental factors could also be influential.

Bibliography Citation
Honeycutt, Todd C. and David R. Mann. "Crime and Parenthood: Factors Affecting the Outcomes of Adolescents With and Without Disabilities." Working Paper 37, Mathematica Policy Research, Princeton, NJ, March 2015.
2. Mann, David R.
Honeycutt, Todd C.
Changes in Disability Status and Survey Attrition for Youth: A Longitudinal Analysis
Mathematica Policy Research Final Report, Submitted to National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, U.S. Department of Education, December 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.
Keyword(s): Attrition; Disability; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Nonresponse

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Disability status--experiencing a functional limitation caused by a health condition--is dynamic throughout the life cycle, even during adolescence and young adulthood. Changes in disability status early in the life cycle may have especially strong ties to future outcomes such as educational attainment and employment. We used data from the 1997 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to better understand these dynamics, examining how disability status evolves during adolescence and young adulthood and how changes in disability status are related to survey non-response and attrition. The dynamics of disability are evident in our data: the proportion of sample members who reported having a disability for any interview increased from about 12 percent during the initial interview (when sample members were 12 to 17 years old) to almost 25 percent 13 years later. Multivariate analysis revealed that women are more likely than men to report changes in health condition or disability status. Those with mild disabilities were relatively less likely than those without or with severe disabilities to experience changes in disability status. Somewhat surprisingly, a survival analysis of survey participation outcomes found limited correlation between health conditions, disability status, and either missing a survey interview for the first time or permanently leaving the survey sample.
Bibliography Citation
Mann, David R. and Todd C. Honeycutt. "Changes in Disability Status and Survey Attrition for Youth: A Longitudinal Analysis." Mathematica Policy Research Final Report, Submitted to National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, U.S. Department of Education, December 2014.
3. Mann, David R.
Honeycutt, Todd C.
Is Timing Everything? Disability Onset of Youth and Their Outcomes As Young Adults
Journal of Disability Policy Studies, 25, 2 (July 2014): 117-129.
Also: http://dps.sagepub.com/content/early/2013/04/22/1044207313484176.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Adolescent health; Disability; Education; Human Capital; Labor Force Participation; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The accumulation of human capital during childhood and adolescence greatly influences the value employers place on youth as they transition into the adult labor market. Disabilities acquired prior to adulthood have the potential to disrupt this critical human capital accumulation. This study examines how disability onset among youth affects their education and employment outcomes as young adults. We find that youth with limiting disabilities—especially mental limiting impairments—have poorer labor market and human capital outcomes than their peers without limitations. We also discover some evidence that youth with persistent or later onset disabilities have poorer outcomes than those whose disabilities dissipate as they become adults. These findings suggest that surveys targeting youth and young adults should consider including better measures of disability onset and mental impairment status to understand the disability characteristics of this population.
Bibliography Citation
Mann, David R. and Todd C. Honeycutt. "Is Timing Everything? Disability Onset of Youth and Their Outcomes As Young Adults." Journal of Disability Policy Studies, 25, 2 (July 2014): 117-129.
4. Mann, David R.
Honeycutt, Todd C.
Understanding the Disability Dynamics of Youth: Health Condition and Limitation Changes for Youth and Their Influence on Longitudinal Survey Attrition
Demography 53,3 (June 2016): 749-776.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13524-016-0469-7
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Attrition; Disability; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Nonresponse

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Disability status--experiencing a functional limitation caused by a health condition--is dynamic throughout the life cycle, even during adolescence and young adulthood. We use data from the 1997 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to better understand these dynamics, examining how health condition and limitation statuses evolve during adolescence and young adulthood as well as how changes in these characteristics are related to survey nonresponse and attrition. Health condition and limitation dynamics are evident in our data: the proportion of sample members who reported having a limitation in their activities for any interview increased from approximately 12% during the initial interview (when sample members were 12 to 17 years old) to almost 25% 13 years later. Multivariate analyses revealed that women are more likely than men to report changes in health condition or limitation status. Those with mild limitations were relatively less likely than those without limitations or with severe limitations to experience changes in limitation status. Somewhat surprisingly, a survival analysis of survey participation outcomes found limited correlation among health conditions, limitations, and either missing a survey interview for the first time or permanently leaving the survey sample.
Bibliography Citation
Mann, David R. and Todd C. Honeycutt. "Understanding the Disability Dynamics of Youth: Health Condition and Limitation Changes for Youth and Their Influence on Longitudinal Survey Attrition." Demography 53,3 (June 2016): 749-776.