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Author: Hill, Elizabeth T.
Resulting in 7 citations.
1. Hill, Elizabeth T.
Labor Market Effects of Women's Post-School-Age Training
Industrial and Labor Relations Review 49,1 (October 1995): 138-149.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2524917
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Cornell University
Keyword(s): Labor Force Participation; Schooling, Post-secondary; Training; Training, Post-School; Unions; Wage Growth; Wages, Women

Data from the National Longitudinal Survey Mature Women's Cohort were used to examine association between training and wages from 1967 to 1984. Women who received post-school-age training (formal education and other training) experienced a greater rise in wages and participated in the labor force at older ages than did women who received no postschool training. (SK)
Bibliography Citation
Hill, Elizabeth T. "Labor Market Effects of Women's Post-School-Age Training." Industrial and Labor Relations Review 49,1 (October 1995): 138-149.
2. Hill, Elizabeth T.
Marital History, Later Training, and the Labor Market: Women's Experiences
Social Science Journal 31,2 (1994): 127-138.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0362331994900132
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: JAI Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Job Training; Labor Force Participation; Marital Disruption; Marital Status; Wages; Women

Using data from the NLS Mature Women's cohort, this study compares the acquisition of education and training after the usual schooling age among women with differing marital histories and measures the effects of that training as well as marital history on labor force participation and wages. Results indicate that women whose marriages ended acquired further training more often than married women. Women without husbands worked full time more years, making human capital investment important for them. Certain types of training (professional, technical, and managerial) resulted in higher wages.
Bibliography Citation
Hill, Elizabeth T. "Marital History, Later Training, and the Labor Market: Women's Experiences." Social Science Journal 31,2 (1994): 127-138.
3. Hill, Elizabeth T.
Post-school-age Training among Women: A Comparison of Education, On-the-Job and Other Training and Their Effects on Wages
Working Paper, Pennsylvania State University - Mont Alto, 1992
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Pennsylvania State University - Mont Alto
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Displaced Homemakers; Family Background and Culture; Family Size; High School Completion/Graduates; Human Capital; Parents, Single; Siblings; Teenagers; Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Education and training are human capital investments which have powerful effects on productivity and wages. Workers and potential workers often seek education and training while employers frequently provide them, recognizing their effect on productivity. Government training programs for disadvantaged workers attempt to increase the labor market value of those workers in order to raise their incomes. Training programs such as the Displaced Homemaker Program have been established to help women offset their labor market disadvantage. The goal of such programs is usually to help those with few labor market skills, often single mothers heading households which fall below the poverty level. Although an attempt was made in some programs to determine occupational demand and tailor training programs accordingly, little has been done to compare methods of training - education, on-the-job training, and other training. This study uses the NLS Mature Women's Cohort and seeks to determine which women receive training of various types and which method appears to result in the greatest increase in wages. Because training programs to aid disadvantaged workers usually aim at workers who are older than the usual schooling age, the acquisition of post-school-age education and training will be investigated. The NLS Mature Women's Cohort contains 5083 women. In order to select women for whom information was available in 1984, this study includes only women who responded to the survey that year, producing a sample of 3.422 cases. Information on age, race, 1967.
Bibliography Citation
Hill, Elizabeth T. "Post-school-age Training among Women: A Comparison of Education, On-the-Job and Other Training and Their Effects on Wages." Working Paper, Pennsylvania State University - Mont Alto, 1992.
4. Hill, Elizabeth T.
Post-School-Age Training among Women: Training Methods and Labor Market Outcomes at Older Ages
Economics of Education Review 20,2 (April 2001): 181-191.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S027277579900059X
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Education; Labor Market Outcomes; Training; Training, On-the-Job; Wage Growth; Wage Levels; Women

This study uses the NLS Mature Women's Cohort to examine labor market effects of education and training on women at pre-retirement ages, comparing training methods: formal education, on-the-job training, and other training. Results show that younger, more educated women tend to train more than other women and that some women appear in a "training track." While both education and on-the-job training are associated with higher wage levels, on-the-job training is most strongly associated with wage growth. Women who acquire training as adults tend to work at older ages. © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Bibliography Citation
Hill, Elizabeth T. "Post-School-Age Training among Women: Training Methods and Labor Market Outcomes at Older Ages." Economics of Education Review 20,2 (April 2001): 181-191.
5. Hill, Elizabeth T.
Pre-retirement Labor Market Effects of Woman's Post-School-Age Training
Working Paper, Department of Economics, Pennsylvania State University - Mont Alto, 1991
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Department of Economics, The Pennsylvania State University
Keyword(s): Education; Educational Returns; Labor Force Participation; Training; Unemployment Rate, Regional; Wages; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Many women acquire education and training after the usual schooling age. This study uses the 1984 NLS Mature Women's cohort to determine whether obtaining post-school-age education or training has an impact on women's labor force participation and wages during the pre-retirement years. The 1984 survey has an advantage in that the oldest of the women in the study were not yet eligible for retirement benefits. The study compares the labor force participation of women who acquired training later and those who did not, examining whether the women worked in 1984 and whether they had plans to work in the future. Results indicate that post-school-age training is associated with greater labor force participation during the pre-retirement years. In addition, during the years immediately preceding the usual retirement age, the wages of women who obtained later training rose at a faster rate than the wages of those women who did not.
Bibliography Citation
Hill, Elizabeth T. "Pre-retirement Labor Market Effects of Woman's Post-School-Age Training." Working Paper, Department of Economics, Pennsylvania State University - Mont Alto, 1991.
6. Hill, Elizabeth T.
The Labor Force Participation of Older Women: Retired? Working? Both?
Monthly Labor Review 125,9 (September 2002): 39-48.
Also: http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2002/09/art4abs.htm
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Career Patterns; Labor Force Participation; Part-Time Work; Re-employment; Retirees; Retirement; Work Reentry

Noneconomic factors--such as level of education, job flexibility in work hours, and physical stress--appear to influence older women's labor force participation more strongly than economic ones, resulting in many "retired" women who are employed.
Bibliography Citation
Hill, Elizabeth T. "The Labor Force Participation of Older Women: Retired? Working? Both?" Monthly Labor Review 125,9 (September 2002): 39-48.
7. Wiens-Tuers, Barbara A.
Hill, Elizabeth T.
How Did We Get Here from There? Movement into Temporary Employment
Journal of Economic Issues 36,2 (June 2002): 303-311.
Also: http://diglib.lib.utk.edu/utj/jei/36/jei-36-2-6.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Association for Evolutionary Economics (AFEE)
Keyword(s): Employment, Part-Time; Family Studies; Part-Time Work; Poverty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Examines the shift in the focus of employers from employment stability to employment flexibility. Impact of the growth of the temporary industry and temporary work on employment, uncertainty, and changing norms; Factors which are associated with people entering into temporary work, including an effort to balance family and work; Use of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth in the analysis; Discussion of poverty among temporary workers.

The paper (see, the .pdf file) was prepared for the annual meeting of the Association for Evolutionary Economics at the Allied Social Science Association meetings in Atlanta, Georgia, January 4–6, 2002 and published in Journal of Economic Issues in 2002.

Bibliography Citation
Wiens-Tuers, Barbara A. and Elizabeth T. Hill. "How Did We Get Here from There? Movement into Temporary Employment." Journal of Economic Issues 36,2 (June 2002): 303-311.