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Author: Henly, Julia
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Lambert, Susan
Fugiel, Peter
Henly, Julia
Precarious Work Schedules among Early-Career Employees in the US: A National Snapshot
Research Brief, EINet (Employment Instability, Family Well-being, and Social Policy Network), University of Chicago, August 27, 2014.
Also: https://ssa.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/uploads/lambert.fugiel.henly_.precarious_work_schedules.august2014_0.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: University of Chicago
Keyword(s): Employment, Intermittent; Job Characteristics; Work Hours; Working Conditions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research brief presents an overview of work schedules among a representative sample of early-career adults (26 to 32 years old) in the United States. Based on an analysis of new items included in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), the brief describes the distribution of three dimensions of work schedules--advance schedule notice, fluctuating work hours, and schedule control--across early-career workers in hourly and non-hourly jobs, overall and separated by gender, regular work hours (full-time/part-time), race, and occupation. In addition, the brief gives special consideration to selected groups of hourly workers, including parents, women, workers of color, and workers in low-pay, high-growth occupations, who are at particular risk of precarious work schedules and economic insecurity. Finally, the brief suggests some implications of these descriptive findings for public policy and future research.
Bibliography Citation
Lambert, Susan, Peter Fugiel and Julia Henly. "Precarious Work Schedules among Early-Career Employees in the US: A National Snapshot." Research Brief, EINet (Employment Instability, Family Well-being, and Social Policy Network), University of Chicago, August 27, 2014.
2. Lambert, Susan
Henly, Julia
Measuring Precarious Work Schedules
Working Paper, The Employment Instability, Family Well-being, and Social Policy Network (EINet), University of Chicago, November 2014.
Also: https://ssascholars.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/einet/files/managingprecariousworkschedules_11.11.2015.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: University of Chicago
Keyword(s): Employment; Well-Being; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this working paper, we suggest new possibilities for measuring unpredictable and fluctuating hours, as well as two other dimensions of work schedules that research has already established hold critical implications for worker and family well-being, namely nostandard work timing and employee control over work schedules. Our recommendations reflect insights gained from analyzing a set of new and revised survey items that were included in a recent round (Round 15) of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 Cohort (NLSY97) and that were designed to tap into each of these four dimensions of work schedules.
Bibliography Citation
Lambert, Susan and Julia Henly. "Measuring Precarious Work Schedules." Working Paper, The Employment Instability, Family Well-being, and Social Policy Network (EINet), University of Chicago, November 2014.
3. Lambert, Susan
Henly, Julia
Fugiel, Peter
The Prevalence of Precarious Work Schedules Among Early-Career Adults in the US
Presented: New Orleans LA, Society for Social Work and Research Annual Conference, January 2015
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Society for Social Work and Research (SSWR)
Keyword(s): Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper presents findings from national data on precarious scheduling practices in the US labor market. Studies in different nations and industries reveal how the scheduling practices today's employers use to contain outlays for labor often result in unstable and unpredictable work hours that undermine worker well-being and family economic security. Yet, national surveys in the US have not included items to gauge the prevalence of precarious scheduling practices, e.g., most surveys intentionally smooth variation by asking about "usual" hours. The papers' authors worked with the Bureau of Labor Statistics to develop measures of hour fluctuations and advance schedule notice that were included in the most recent round of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97). Combined with existing items on schedule input and nonstandard timing, the NLSY now offers a uniquely comprehensive picture of precarious scheduling practices among a nationally representative sample of early-career adults.
Bibliography Citation
Lambert, Susan, Julia Henly and Peter Fugiel. "The Prevalence of Precarious Work Schedules Among Early-Career Adults in the US." Presented: New Orleans LA, Society for Social Work and Research Annual Conference, January 2015.