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Author: Grinnell-Davis, Claudette L.
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Lee, Na Youn
Hong, Jun Sung
Grinnell-Davis, Claudette L.
The Impact of Child, Mother, and Neighborhood Factors On the Use of Corporal Punishment: A Longitudinal Repeated Measures Analysis
Presented: Washington DC, Society for Social Work and Research Meeting, January 2012.
Also: http://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2012/webprogram/Paper17093.html
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Society for Social Work and Research (SSWR)
Keyword(s): Behavior, Antisocial; Behavioral Problems; Body Parts Recognition; Discipline; Family Income; Neighborhood Effects; Punishment, Corporal

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Purpose: Corporal punishment is a widespread form of child discipline. However, there is a fine line between corporal punishment and child maltreatment, and modern societies are becoming aware of this line as reports of child abuse increase rapidly. Surprisingly, in comparison to cross-sectional studies, there are few longitudinal studies on the predictors of corporal punishment. Thus, this study aims to describe the child, mother, and community factors that increase the use of corporal punishment over time, by conducting a longitudinal repeated measures analysis.

Method: The study used a sample of 4,287 children and youth, ages 0 to 14, from the five waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, and 2008). Dependent variable is the number of times mothers spanked their children in the past week. Independent variables in the model include the following: Children's scores from the Behavior Problems Index; family poverty; mother's health and marital status; community resources (afterschool daycare, recreational centers); and maternal perceptions of neighborhood safety. Covariates include child and mother demographics. Models were estimated using hierarchal linear modeling (HLM) in STATA 11SE to trace the patterns nested inside individual children over time.

Results: Child's age, race, and BPI scores were significantly associated with corporal punishment over time. Younger children, African American, and Hispanic children, and those with behavior problems received more spankings (p<0.001). Poor mothers also appeared to spank their children more (p<0.001); this was the only maternal factor to achieve significance in the model. As for neighborhood variables, the use of community resources did not significantly decrease the number of spankings children received over time. However, mothers who reported their neighborhood is safe for raising children spanked their children less (p<0.05). Lastly, the likelihood-ratio tests indicate that HLM adds more explanatory power to the model compared to OLS (p<0.001). This lends support for accounting for the random variations in the intercept by the individual child, capturing the story that each child starts from a different point

Bibliography Citation
Lee, Na Youn, Jun Sung Hong and Claudette L. Grinnell-Davis. "The Impact of Child, Mother, and Neighborhood Factors On the Use of Corporal Punishment: A Longitudinal Repeated Measures Analysis." Presented: Washington DC, Society for Social Work and Research Meeting, January 2012.