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Author: Golan, Limor
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Antonovics, Kate
Golan, Limor
Experimentation and Job Choice
Working Paper, Tepper School of Business, Carnegie Mellon University, 2010.
Also: http://repository.cmu.edu/tepper/123/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Carnegie Mellon University
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Occupational Choice; Occupations; Skills; Wage Growth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines optimal job choices when jobs differ in the rate at which they reveal information about workers' skills. We then analyze how the optimal level of experimentation changes over a worker's career and characterize job transitions and wage growth over the life-cycle. Using the Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT) merged with the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79), we then construct an index of how much information different occupations reveal about workers' skills and document patterns of occupational choice and wage growth that are consistent with a tradeoff between information and wages.
Bibliography Citation
Antonovics, Kate and Limor Golan. "Experimentation and Job Choice." Working Paper, Tepper School of Business, Carnegie Mellon University, 2010.
2. Antonovics, Kate
Golan, Limor
Experimentation and Job Choice
Journal of Labor Economics 30,2 (April 2012): 333-366.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/663356
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Occupational Choice; Occupations; Skills; Wage Growth

In this article, we examine optimal job choices when jobs differ in the rate at which they reveal information about workers’ skills. We then analyze how the optimal level of experimentation changes over a worker’s career and characterize job transitions and wage growth over the life cycle. Using the Dictionary of Occupational Titles merged with the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we then construct an index of how much information different occupations reveal about workers’ skills and document patterns of occupational choice and wage growth that are consistent with a trade-off between information and wages.
Bibliography Citation
Antonovics, Kate and Limor Golan. "Experimentation and Job Choice." Journal of Labor Economics 30,2 (April 2012): 333-366.
3. Canon, Maria E.
Golan, Limor
Smith, Cody A.
Understanding the Gender Earnings Gap: Hours Worked, Occupational Sorting, and Labor Market Experience
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis Review (Second Quarter 2021): 175-205.
Also: https://doi.org/10.20955/r.103.175-205
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Labor Market Outcomes; Life Cycle Research; Occupational Choice; Wage Gap; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article documents life-cycle gender differences in labor market outcomes using longitudinal data of a cohort of individuals from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. As in other datasets, the gender earnings gap increases with age. We find that hours worked and labor market experience are the most substantial observable variables in explaining the gender pay gap. We also focus on patterns in occupational changes over the life cycle, as a large part of pay growth occurs when workers change jobs. We find that college-educated men, on average, move into occupations with higher task complexity. We further show that women are less likely to change occupations. Moreover, on average, pay grows when workers change occupations, but the growth is smaller for women. Finally, we discuss theories that are consistent with the patterns we document.
Bibliography Citation
Canon, Maria E., Limor Golan and Cody A. Smith. "Understanding the Gender Earnings Gap: Hours Worked, Occupational Sorting, and Labor Market Experience." Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis Review (Second Quarter 2021): 175-205.
4. Golan, Limor
Sanders, Carl
Racial Gaps, Occupational Matching, and Skill Uncertainty
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis Review, Second Quarter (2019): 135-53.
Also: https://doi.org/10.20955/r.101.135-53
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis
Keyword(s): Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT); Occupations; Racial Differences; Skills; Wage Gap

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

White workers in the United States earn almost 30 percent more per hour on average than Black workers, and this wage gap is associated with large racial differences in occupational assignments. In this article, we theoretically and empirically examine the Black-White disparity in occupations. First, we present a model based on Antonovics and Golan (2012) that relates occupational assignments to the incentives workers face while learning about their own unknown ability. Second, we document differences between Black and White workers in both the complexity of skills required in their initial occupations and the growth rates of this complexity over time. To do this, we match panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 with the Dictionary of Occupational Titles measures of occupational characteristics and find that, compared with White workers, Black workers start in occupations requiring less-complex skills, see slower growth in job complexity over time, and are relatively more likely to transition to jobs with lower complexity. Finally, we consider the relationship between our model and our empirical findings; for example, discrimination in hiring early in the career can have long-term consequences on the ability of Black workers to learn their best occupational match and explains part of their lower wage growth. We conclude with suggestions for policy and future research directions.
Bibliography Citation
Golan, Limor and Carl Sanders. "Racial Gaps, Occupational Matching, and Skill Uncertainty." Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis Review, Second Quarter (2019): 135-53.