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Author: Glauber, Rebecca
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Glauber, Rebecca
Family-friendly Policies for Rural Working Mothers
Policy Brief No 15, Carsey Institute, Dunham, NH: University of New Hampshire, Summer 2009.
Also: http://www.carseyinstitute.unh.edu/publications/PB_FamilyPolicies_09.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Carsey Institute
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Education; Income; Insurance, Health; Job Training; Labor Force Participation; Leave, Family or Maternity/Paternity; Occupational Status; Rural Women; Rural/Urban Differences; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This brief presents an analysis of differences in access to family-friendly policies between rural and urban mothers. Rural Americans are disadvantaged in income, education, and employment (see Table 1). As this brief shows, they are also less likely to have access to family-friendly policies. Compared to urban mothers, rural mothers are less likely to have access to paid sick days, health insurance, dental insurance, parental leave, flextime, and job training. Single mothers in rural America fare the worst, primarily because they have less education, they work for smaller firms, and they work in occupations and industries that are less likely to offer family-friendly benefits.
Bibliography Citation
Glauber, Rebecca. "Family-friendly Policies for Rural Working Mothers." Policy Brief No 15, Carsey Institute, Dunham, NH: University of New Hampshire, Summer 2009.
2. Glauber, Rebecca
Gender and Race in Families and at Work: Fatherhood and Men's Labor Market Outcomes
Ph.D. Dissertation, New York University, 2007
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Economics of Gender; Fatherhood; Gender; Life Course; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Racial Differences; Wage Gap

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Why does the gender gap in earnings increase over women and men's life course? Why are mothers penalized in the labor market, whereas fathers are rewarded? Most studies have answered these questions by focusing on the devaluation of women's work and on the dilemmas that mothers face in negotiating competing demands of work and families. In contrast, I focus on patterns of gender-linked advantages for men in work and families. I analyze fathers' labor market outcomes by drawing on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and the 1970 to 2000 U.S. Censuses. I argue that gender structures mothers and fathers' experiences in work and families and reduces women's long-term occupational prospects and possibilities for economic independence while increasing men's.

I find that gender intersects with race, class, and occupational status and leads to a larger fatherhood wage premium for relatively advantaged men (married, whites, professionals, or the college educated). For married white men, one child is associated with a $7,300 increase in annual earnings. For married black men, one child is associated with a $3,100 increase in annual earnings. Although married white men earn a premium for each additional child, married black men pay a penalty for having more than two children. Married white men also spend more time at work on the birth of a child, whereas married black men do not. These outcomes remain robust in fixed effects and instrumental variable models. They likely reflect the gender division of labor as well as employers' preferential treatment of fathers over childless men.

Over the past three decades married white men have experienced a significant reduction in their fatherhood earnings premium. Married black men have not experienced any change in the small premium that they earn for having one and two children, and they have experienced an increase in the penalty that they pay for having a third child. The rise of racial inequality between married white and black fathers parallels the erosion of black men's employment stability. As gender inequality between mothers and fathers subsided over the past thirty years, racial inequality among married fathers has increased.

Bibliography Citation
Glauber, Rebecca. Gender and Race in Families and at Work: Fatherhood and Men's Labor Market Outcomes. Ph.D. Dissertation, New York University, 2007.
3. Glauber, Rebecca
Marriage and the Motherhood Wage Penalty Among African Americans, Hispanics, and Whites
Journal of Marriage and Family 69,4 (November 2007): 951-961.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4622500
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; Labor Market Outcomes; Marriage; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Motherhood; Racial Studies; Wage Differentials; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty

This study draws on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 5,929) to analyze the moderating effects of race and marriage on the motherhood wage penalty. Fixed-effects models reveal that for Hispanic women, motherhood is not associated with a wage penalty. For African Americans, only married mothers with more than 2 children pay a wage penalty. For Whites, all married mothers pay a wage penalty, as do all never-married mothers and divorced mothers with 1 or 2 children. These findings imply that racial differences in the motherhood wage penalty persist even for women with similar marital statuses, and they suggest that patterns of racial stratification shape women's family experiences and labor market outcomes. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Marriage & Family is the property of Blackwell Publishing Limited and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Glauber, Rebecca. "Marriage and the Motherhood Wage Penalty Among African Americans, Hispanics, and Whites ." Journal of Marriage and Family 69,4 (November 2007): 951-961.
4. Glauber, Rebecca
Race and Gender in Families and at Work:The Fatherhood Wage Premium
Gender and Society 22,1 (February 2008): 8-30.
Also: http://gas.sagepub.com/content/22/1/8.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Birth Outcomes; Ethnic Differences; Family Formation; Fatherhood; Gender; Labor Market Outcomes; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Parenthood; Racial Differences; Wage Models

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to explore the intersections of gender anti race on fathers' labor market outcomes. Fixed-effects models reveal that for married whites and Latinos, the birth of a child is associated with an increase in hourly wages, annual earnings, and annual time spent at work. For married Black men, the birth of a child is associated with a smaller increase in hourly wages and annual earnings but not associated with an increase in annual time spent at work. Furthermore, married Black men do not experience an increase in hourly wages or work hours because of a reduction in their wives' work hours. In contrast, married whites and Latinos earn more when their wives work less. These findings imply that gendered workplace and family experiences differ among fathers and that not all men benefit from specific family formations in exactly the same way. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Gender & Society is the property of Sage Publications Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Glauber, Rebecca. "Race and Gender in Families and at Work:The Fatherhood Wage Premium." Gender and Society 22,1 (February 2008): 8-30.
5. Glauber, Rebecca
Women’s Work and Working Conditions: Are Mothers Compensated for Lost Wages?
Work and Occupations 39,2 (May 2012):115-138.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/39/2/115.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Maternal Employment; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Motherhood; Occupational Choice; Occupations; Occupations, Female; Wage Gap; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Few studies have analyzed variation in the motherhood wage penalty by the sex composition of women’s jobs. This study draws on nationally representative data to investigate the motherhood wage penalty for women who work in female-dominated, male-dominated, and integrated jobs. Fixed-effects estimates reveal that women who work in female-dominated jobs pay a larger motherhood wage penalty than women who work in other jobs. This larger penalty is not offset by measurable compensating differentials, such as flexible scheduling or part-time work hours.
Bibliography Citation
Glauber, Rebecca. "Women’s Work and Working Conditions: Are Mothers Compensated for Lost Wages? ." Work and Occupations 39,2 (May 2012):115-138.
6. Glauber, Rebecca
Gozjolko, Kristi L.
Do Traditional Fathers Always Work More? Gender Ideology, Race, and Parenthood
Journal of Marriage and Family 73,5 (October 2011): 1133-1148.
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Fatherhood; Fathers; Gender Attitudes/Roles; Racial Differences; Work Hours

Research has shown that men who express traditional gender ideologies spend more time in paid work when they become fathers, whereas men who express egalitarian ideologies spend less time in paid work. This study extends previous research by examining racial differences among men. We drew on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (N = 23,261) and found that fatherhood was associated with an increase in married White men's time spent in paid work. The increase was more than twice as strong for traditional White men than for egalitarian White men. In contrast, both egalitarian and traditional African American men did not work more when they became fathers. These findings suggest that African American men may express gender traditionalism but adopt more egalitarian work–family arrangements. This study also presents evidence of an interaction among race, class, and gender ideology that shapes fathers' time spent in paid work.
Bibliography Citation
Glauber, Rebecca and Kristi L. Gozjolko. "Do Traditional Fathers Always Work More? Gender Ideology, Race, and Parenthood." Journal of Marriage and Family 73,5 (October 2011): 1133-1148.
7. Glauber, Rebecca
Young, Justin Robert
On the Fringe: Family-Friendly Benefits and the Rural-Urban Gap Among Working Women
Journal of Family and Economic Issues 36,1 (March 2015): 97-113.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10834-014-9418-z/fulltext.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Insurance, Health; Leave, Family or Maternity/Paternity; Rural Women; Rural/Urban Differences; Unions; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study drew on longitudinal, nationally representative data to estimate rural-urban inequality in women's access to family-friendly benefits. Multivariate fixed effects regression models showed that compared to urban women, rural women's odds of reporting access were 11% lower for flexible work scheduling, 24% lower for job-protected maternity leave, 13% lower for paid sick time, 21% lower for vacation time, and 20% lower for health insurance. The rural-urban gap in sick time was explained by differences in unionization, as rural women were less likely to be unionized than urban women. Our findings suggest that rural women's work-family experiences may be more constrained than urban women's work-family experiences.
Bibliography Citation
Glauber, Rebecca and Justin Robert Young. "On the Fringe: Family-Friendly Benefits and the Rural-Urban Gap Among Working Women." Journal of Family and Economic Issues 36,1 (March 2015): 97-113.
8. Scott, Marc M.
Glauber, Rebecca
Mapping Careers in the Low-Wage Labor Market
Presented: San Diego, CA, Industrial Relations and Research Association Meetings, January 2004
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Industrial Relations Research Association ==> LERA
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Educational Attainment; Exits; Labor Market Outcomes; Skills; Training; Wages, Youth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using over twenty years of data on the careers of young workers represented in the NLSY, we identify workers who are stuck in low-wage, dead-end jobs over the long run. We contrast these career paths to the careers of individuals with similar backgrounds and skills who managed to secure careers with more growth potential. We characterize these more and less successful trajectories in terms of the sequencing of industries and occupations over time. We then attempt to classify or cluster similar career paths, where similarity is judged primarily on the patterning of industry and occupation over time. Other factors that will be used to characterize these histories include the amount of job changing, unemployment, and exits from the labor force each path contains, as well as educational attainment and training. This analysis will provide us, for the first time, with a concrete mapping of typical career paths in the low-wage labor market, a much needed starting point for informed policy discussion around building career ladders ?Mapping Careers in the Low-Wage Labor Market?
Bibliography Citation
Scott, Marc M. and Rebecca Glauber. "Mapping Careers in the Low-Wage Labor Market." Presented: San Diego, CA, Industrial Relations and Research Association Meetings, January 2004.