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Author: Gillespie, Brian Joseph
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Gillespie, Brian Joseph
Adolescent Behavior and Achievement, Social Capital, and the Timing of Geographic Mobility
Advances in Life Course Research 18,3 (September 2013): 223-233.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1040260813000178
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Achievement; Adolescent Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Children, Academic Development; Extracurricular Activities/Sports; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility, Residential; Modeling, Multilevel; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Social Capital

This paper examines the relationship between geographic mobility and adolescent academic achievement and behavior problems. Specifically, it addresses how the effects of moving differ by age and how social capital moderates the impact of moving on children (aged six to 15). Children's behavior problems and academic achievement test scores were compared across four survey waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (2000, 2002, 2004, and 2006) and matched to data from their mothers’ reports from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. The findings indicate that the negative behavioral effects of geographic mobility on adolescents are most pronounced for individuals relocating to a new city, county, or state as opposed to those moving locally (i.e., within the same city). Furthermore, as suggested by a life-course perspective, the negative effects of moving on behavior problems decrease as children get older. The results also show that several social capital factors moderate the effects of moving on behavior but not achievement.
Bibliography Citation
Gillespie, Brian Joseph. "Adolescent Behavior and Achievement, Social Capital, and the Timing of Geographic Mobility." Advances in Life Course Research 18,3 (September 2013): 223-233.
2. Gillespie, Brian Joseph
Community and Locational Factors Affecting Child Well-Being after a Residential Move
Presented: Atlanta GA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2010
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Academic Development; Achievement; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Mobility, Residential; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Social Capital

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the relationship between residential mobility and adolescent academic achievement and behavior problems. Specifically, it addresses how community and family protective factors (social capital) as well as geographic location buffer the negative effects of moving on children. This paper also explores the extent to which different dimensions of residential mobility affect specific adolescent outcome domains differently. Children’s behavior problems and academic achievement test scores were compared across four survey waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (2000, 2002, 2004, and 2006) and matched to data from their mothers' reports from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. This allows testing for the effects of residential mobility while controlling for other theoretically important factors, including child’s age. The results suggest that locational characteristics are significant predictors for academic achievement after residential relocation while community and family protective factors affect behavior problems. The results also suggest that the negative effects of moving on behavior problems decrease as children get older. The findings indicate a more complex relationship among moving, social capital, and child outcomes than expected.
Bibliography Citation
Gillespie, Brian Joseph. "Community and Locational Factors Affecting Child Well-Being after a Residential Move." Presented: Atlanta GA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2010.
3. Gillespie, Brian Joseph
Household Mobility in America: Patterns, Processes, and Outcomes
Palgrave Macmillan, 2017: DOI: 10.1057/978-1-349-68271-3.
Also: http://link.springer.com/book/10.1057/978-1-349-68271-3
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Life Course; Mobility; Mobility, Residential

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The author studies household mobility and includes multiple chapters using data from NLSY cohorts. In particular, see "Household Mobility Decisions and Location Choice" and "Individual- and Family-Level Mobility Effects" (NLSY97) and "Mobility Effects and Cumulative Mobility Contexts" (NLSY79 and Children of the NLSY79).
Bibliography Citation
Gillespie, Brian Joseph. Household Mobility in America: Patterns, Processes, and Outcomes. Palgrave Macmillan, 2017: DOI: 10.1057/978-1-349-68271-3..
4. Gillespie, Brian Joseph
Parents, Children, and Residential Mobility in Life Course Perspective
Ph.D. Dissertation, University of California, Irvine, 2012
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Achievement; Adolescent Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Academic Development; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility, Residential; Modeling, Multilevel; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Social Capital

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This multi-paper dissertation addresses the association of residential mobility with different realms of individual and family outcomes as well as the implications of family on residential mobility and choice. The first section reviews the existing literature on residential mobility and implications for families. Situated in a life course perspective, the three substantive chapters include: (1) a longitudinal analysis of the implications of residential mobility for child educational achievement and behavior at different stages of adolescence, (2) an examination of the association between residential mobility and changes in parenting processes, and (3) a longitudinal analysis of the relationship between early intergenerational and family solidarity and later geographic distance to parents in the Netherlands. The concluding section of the dissertation summarizes the findings of these three chapters and situates the findings within a broader theoretical and empirical context. Residential Mobility and Adolescent Achievement and Behavior. Chapter two examines the relationship between residential mobility and adolescent academic achievement and behavior problems. Specifically, this chapter addresses how the effects of moving differ by age and how social capital moderates the impact of moving on children. Children's behavior problems and academic achievement test scores were compared across four survey waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (2000, 2002, 2004, and 2006) and matched to data from their mothers' reports from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. As suggested by a life-course perspective, the negative effects of moving on behavior problems decrease as children get older. The results also show that several social capital factors moderate the effects of moving on behavior but not achievement. Residential Mobility and Change in Parenting Processes. In chapter three, the association between residential mobility and changes in parenting style and parental monitoring are investigated using panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. Logistic and multinomial logistic regression results indicate that moving is not significantly associated with change in parental monitoring. Moving is significantly associated with changes in parenting style for both mothers and fathers. However, specific changes in parenting styles for residentially mobile mothers and fathers depend upon the parenting style exhibited before the move. These changes also depend on the gender composition of the parent-child dyad. Early Intergenerational Cohesion and Later Geographic Distance to Parents. The aim of the fourth chapter is to provide a clearer understanding of the longitudinal factors affecting adult children's geographic distance to their parents. Using the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study, regression analysis was adopted to determine the relationship between early parent-child closeness (ages 18–35) and later adult geographic distance to parents, controlling for a host of theoretically important variables. The findings indicate that early closeness to parent is significantly associated with later geographic distance to parents. Preliminary support for these findings is shown using nationally representative data from the United States.
Bibliography Citation
Gillespie, Brian Joseph. Parents, Children, and Residential Mobility in Life Course Perspective. Ph.D. Dissertation, University of California, Irvine, 2012.
5. Gillespie, Brian Joseph
Residential Mobility and Change and Continuity in Parenting Processes
Journal of Research on Adolescence 25,2 (June 2015): 279-294.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jora.12114/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Mobility, Residential; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parenting Skills/Styles

This research investigates the association between residential mobility and changes in parenting style and parental monitoring using panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 on adolescents aged 14-18 (N = 2,631). Logistic and multinomial logistic regression results indicate that moving is significantly associated with an increase in parental monitoring for fathers and sons, but not mothers and daughters. Residential mobility is also associated with changes in parenting style for mothers and fathers. However, specific changes in parenting styles for residentially mobile mothers and fathers depend upon the parenting style exhibited before the move. These changes also depend upon the gender composition of the parent-child relationship.
Bibliography Citation
Gillespie, Brian Joseph. "Residential Mobility and Change and Continuity in Parenting Processes." Journal of Research on Adolescence 25,2 (June 2015): 279-294.
6. Gillespie, Brian Joseph
The Effects of Residential Mobility on Child Academic Achievement and Behavior Problems
Presented: San Diego, CA: Annual Meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association, 2009.
Also: http://www.socsci.uci.edu/files/socsci/profiles/cvs/bgillesp_121939.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Sociology, University of California - Irvine
Keyword(s): Academic Development; Achievement; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Mobility; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Residence; Social Capital

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the relationship between residential mobility and adolescent academic achievement and behavior problems. Specifically, it addresses how community and family protective factors (social capital) as well as geographic location buffer the negative effects of moving on children. This paper also explores the extent to which different dimensions of residential mobility affect specific adolescent outcome domains differently. Children's behavior problems and academic achievement test scores were compared across four survey waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (2000, 2002, 2004, and 2006) and matched to data from their mothers' reports from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. This allows testing for the effects of residential mobility while controlling for other theoretically important factors, including child's age. The results suggest that locational characteristics are significant predictors for academic achievement after residential relocation while community and family protective factors affect behavior problems. The results also suggest that the negative effects of moving on behavior problems decrease as children get older. The findings indicate a more complex relationship among moving, social capital, and child outcomes than expected.
Bibliography Citation
Gillespie, Brian Joseph. "The Effects of Residential Mobility on Child Academic Achievement and Behavior Problems." Presented: San Diego, CA: Annual Meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association, 2009.
7. Gillespie, Brian Joseph
Treas, Judith A.
Adolescent Intergenerational Cohesiveness and Young Adult Proximity to Mothers
Journal of Family Issues 38,6 (April 2017): 798-819.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0192513X15598548
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Modeling, Probit; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We consider how mother–child cohesion in adolescence relates to geographic proximity in young adulthood. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (N = 3,985), ordered probit models the association between adolescents' emotional closeness to mother and subsequent residential distance, controlling for key factors. Young people "at risk" of living at a distance (i.e., who have left the parental home) may be characterized by poorer relationships with parents. To take account of potential selection bias, two-stage Heckit models address spatial proximity as it relates to the choice to live with parents. The results suggest that emotional closeness to mother is robustly associated with later spatial proximity. The finding holds controlling for family structure, which is often taken as proxy for relationship quality. Although emotional closeness figures in the decision to leave home and move away, we do not find that selection out of coresidence biases the results for geographic proximity.
Bibliography Citation
Gillespie, Brian Joseph and Judith A. Treas. "Adolescent Intergenerational Cohesiveness and Young Adult Proximity to Mothers." Journal of Family Issues 38,6 (April 2017): 798-819.
8. Gillespie, Brian Joseph
Treas, Judith A.
Adolescent Intergenerational Cohesiveness and Young Adult Proximity to Parents
Presented: San Francisco CA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Residence; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper considers how parent-child cohesion in adolescence relates to young adults’ geographic proximity to parents. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (N = 2,736), ordered probit models the association between adolescents’ emotional closeness to parents and subsequent residential distance, controlling for key factors. Young people “at risk” of living at a distance (i.e., who have moved out of the parental home) may be characterized by poorer relationships with parents. To take account of potential selection bias, two-stage Heckit models address spatial proximity as it relates to the choice to live with parents. At least for mothers, emotional closeness is robustly associated with later spatial proximity. The finding holds controlling for family structure, which is often taken as proxy for relationship quality. Although emotional closeness figures in the decision to leave home, we do not find that selection out of coresidence biases the results for geographic proximity.
Bibliography Citation
Gillespie, Brian Joseph and Judith A. Treas. "Adolescent Intergenerational Cohesiveness and Young Adult Proximity to Parents." Presented: San Francisco CA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2014.