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Author: Fox, Liana E.
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Fox, Liana E.
Three Papers on the Black-White Mobility Gap in the United States
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Social Work, Columbia University, 2013
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Family Income; Mobility, Economic; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Racial Differences; Wage Gap

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Paper 2: Measuring the Black-White Mobility Gap: A Comparison of Datasets and Methods. Chapter 3 utilizes both the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) and the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) to analyze the magnitude and nature of black-white gaps in intergenerational earnings and income mobility in the United States. This chapter finds that relying on different datasets or measures will lead to different conclusions about the relative magnitudes of black versus white elasticities and correlations, but using directional mobility matrices consistently reveals a sizable mobility gap between black and white families, with low-income black families disproportionately trapped at the bottom of the income distribution and more advantaged black children more likely to lose that advantage in adulthood than similarly situated white children. I find the family income analyses to be most consistent and estimate the upward mobility gap as between 19.1 and 20.3 percentage points and the downward gap between -20.9 and -21.0. Additionally, I find that racial disparities are much greater among sons than daughters and that incarceration and being raised in a female-headed household have much larger impacts on the mobility prospects of blacks than whites.
Bibliography Citation
Fox, Liana E. Three Papers on the Black-White Mobility Gap in the United States. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Social Work, Columbia University, 2013.
2. Fox, Liana E.
Hutto, Nathan
The Effect of Obesity on Intergenerational Income Mobility
Presented: Dallas, TX, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2010
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Family History; Family Income; Gender; Income; Mobility; Obesity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Utilizing the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), this paper examines the likelihood of upward and downward mobility by obesity status (normal, overweight, and obese) and gender. Using temporal ordering to establish a direction of causality, we examine parental income when the child was living at home, BMI in early adulthood, and adult family income at age 38-43. We find that obesity both dampens upward mobility and increases the likelihood of downward mobility for women. We do not find the same trends for obese men, who alternatively have a greater likelihood of upward mobility. This research finds that obesity in early adulthood places women on a poor income trajectory throughout adulthood relative to parental income. The health consequences and social stigma of obesity perpetuate and deepen economic disparities among women. The lasting impact of obesity highlights the need for intervention in adolescence and early adulthood.
Bibliography Citation
Fox, Liana E. and Nathan Hutto. "The Effect of Obesity on Intergenerational Income Mobility." Presented: Dallas, TX, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2010.
3. Han, Wen-Jui
Fox, Liana E.
Children's Cognitive Trajectories in the Context of Parental Work Schedules
Presented: Tampa FL, Society for Social Work and Research Annual Conference, January 2011
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Society for Social Work and Research (SSWR)
Keyword(s): Children, Academic Development; Cognitive Ability; Cognitive Development; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Modeling, Multilevel; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Interaction; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Shift Workers; Welfare; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper investigates the relationship between parental work schedules (e.g., working evenings, nights, or early mornings) and children's cognitive trajectories from age 5 to age 14. This issue is important because a great number of parents work nonstandard shifts in order to share care responsibilities for their children. While many parents intentionally seek a nonstandard shift as a strategy to provide daytime or after-school care for their children, for many other parents, a nonstandard shift is not an option but a requirement of the job that can put pressure on work-family balance. Nonstandard schedules can facilitate or impede parent-child contact, which in turn has implications for children's well-being.
Bibliography Citation
Han, Wen-Jui and Liana E. Fox. "Children's Cognitive Trajectories in the Context of Parental Work Schedules." Presented: Tampa FL, Society for Social Work and Research Annual Conference, January 2011.
4. Han, Wen-Jui
Fox, Liana E.
Parental Work Schedules and Children's Cognitive Trajectories
Journal of Marriage and Family 73,5 (October 2011): 962-980.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1741-3737.2011.00862.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Children, Academic Development; Cognitive Ability; Cognitive Development; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Modeling, Multilevel; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Interaction; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Shift Workers; Welfare; Work Hours

Previous work has shown an association between mothers' nonstandard work schedules and children's well-being. We built on this research by examining the relationship between parental shift work and children's reading and math trajectories from age 5–6 to 13–14. Using data (N = 7,105) from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and growth-curve modeling, we found that children's math and reading trajectories were related to parents' nonstandard shifts (i.e., evening, night, or variable). We found that having a mother who worked more years at a night shift was associated with lower reading scores, having a mother work more years at evening or night shifts was associated with reduced math trajectories, and having a father work more years at an evening shift was associated with reduced math scores. Mediation tests suggest that eating meals together, parental knowledge about children's whereabouts, and certain after-school activities might help explain these results.
Bibliography Citation
Han, Wen-Jui and Liana E. Fox. "Parental Work Schedules and Children's Cognitive Trajectories." Journal of Marriage and Family 73,5 (October 2011): 962-980.