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Author: Foster, E. Michael
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. D'Elio, Mary Ann
O'Brien, Robert W.
Grayton, Candice Magee
Keane, Michael J.
Connell, David C.
Hailey, Linda
Foster, E. Michael
Reaching Out to Families: Head Start Recruitment and Enrollment Practices
Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC, 2001.
Also: http://www.childcareresearch.org/SendPdf?resourceId=4158
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Administration for Children and Families (AFC)
Keyword(s): Child Care; Child Health; Family Decision-making/Conflict; Family History; Family Income; Family Studies; Head Start; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Prepared for: Louisa B. Tarullo, Ed.D.; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Child Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children, Youth and Families, Head Start Bureau.

The Feasibility Study of Head Start Recruitment and Enrollment was designed to provide information about Head Start's recruitment and enrollment activities. The central purpose of the study was to determine the feasibility and utility of obtaining information from secondary analyses of existing data and from primary data collection efforts regarding 1) the procedures that Head Start programs employed in the recruitment and enrollment of families and children, 2) the characteristics of eligible families, and 3) the reasons why some families with Head Start-eligible children chose not to enroll their children in the program.

Bibliography Citation
D'Elio, Mary Ann, Robert W. O'Brien, Candice Magee Grayton, Michael J. Keane, David C. Connell, Linda Hailey and E. Michael Foster. "Reaching Out to Families: Head Start Recruitment and Enrollment Practices." Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC, 2001.
2. Foster, E. Michael
Watkins, Stephanie
The Value of Reanalysis: TV Viewing and Attention Problems
Child Development 81,1 (January/February 2010): 368-375.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2009.01400.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Modeling, Fixed Effects; Mothers, Education; Television Viewing

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 1,159), this study reexamines the link between maternal reports of television viewing at ages 1 and 3 and attention problems at age 7. This work represents a reanalysis and extension of recent research suggesting young children's television viewing causes subsequent attention problems. The nonlinear specification reveals the association between television watching and attention problems exists--if at all--only at very high levels of viewing. Adding 2 covariates to the regression model eliminated even this modest effect. The earlier findings are not robust. This study also considers whether its own findings are sensitive to unobserved confounding using fixed-effects estimation. In general, it finds no meaningful relation between television viewing and attention problems. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Foster, E. Michael and Stephanie Watkins. "The Value of Reanalysis: TV Viewing and Attention Problems." Child Development 81,1 (January/February 2010): 368-375.
3. Hoffman, Saul D.
Foster, E. Michael
AFDC Benefits and Nonmarital Births to Young Women
JCPR Working Paper 3, Joint Center for Poverty Research, June 1997.
Also: http://ideas.repec.org/p/wop/jopovw/3.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Joint Center for Poverty Research
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Behavior; Childbearing, Adolescent; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Building on recent work by Rosenzweig (1999), this paper re-examines the effect of AFDC benefits on early nonmarital childbearing. Unlike most previous work in this area, Rosenzweig finds a statistically significant and quantitatively large positive effect of AFDC benefits. Using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, we replicate Rosenzweig's analysis and explore the reasons his findings differ from earlier research findings. We are able to reproduce his main finding that AFDC generosity influences non-marital childbearing when state and cohort fixed-effects are included. However, we find that model specification matters a great deal. An alternative specification of state fixed-effects yields no evidence of an AFDC effect, and when we focus on fertility only through age 19 (as in prior work), we also find no AFDC effect. This latter finding implies that the behavior of women in their early 20s may be far more sensitive to welfare generosity than is that of teenagers.
Bibliography Citation
Hoffman, Saul D. and E. Michael Foster. "AFDC Benefits and Nonmarital Births to Young Women." JCPR Working Paper 3, Joint Center for Poverty Research, June 1997.
4. Hoffman, Saul D.
Foster, E. Michael
Furstenberg, Frank F. Jr.
Re-evaluating the Costs of Teenage Childbearing
Presented: Bethesda, MA, NICHD Conference, "Outcomes of Early Childbearing: An Appraisal of Recent Evidence", May 1992
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing; Childbearing, Adolescent; Family Background; Family Size; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Siblings; Well-Being

Teenage childbearing in the U.S. has long been regarded as an important social problem with substantial costs to mothers and their children. Recently, however, several researchers have argued that these apparent negative effect primarily reflect unmeasured family background rather than the true causal effect of a teen birth. To unravel the effect of teen motherhood from that of family background, we, following the methodology proposed by Geronimus and Korenman, compare teen mothers with their sisters, using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. We find that taking full account of family background reduces, but does not eliminate, the estimated consequences of early childbearing. Statistically significant and quantitatively important effects of teen parenthood remain for high school graduation, family size, and a set of measures of economic well-being.
Bibliography Citation
Hoffman, Saul D., E. Michael Foster and Frank F. Jr. Furstenberg. "Re-evaluating the Costs of Teenage Childbearing." Presented: Bethesda, MA, NICHD Conference, "Outcomes of Early Childbearing: An Appraisal of Recent Evidence", May 1992.
5. Hoffman, Saul D.
Foster, E. Michael
Furstenberg, Frank F. Jr.
Reevaluating the Costs of Teenage Childbearing
Demography 30,1 (February 1993): 1-13.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2061859
Cohort(s): NLS General, NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing; Childbearing, Adolescent; Family Background; Family Size; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Siblings; Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Teenage childbearing in the United States has long been regarded as an important social problem with substantial costs to teen mothers and their children. Recently, however, several researchers have argued that the apparent negative effects of teenage childbearing primarily reflect unmeasured family background rather than the true consequences of a teen birth. To distinguish the effect of teen childbearing from that of family background, we use data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and compare teen mothers with their sisters. We find that accounting for unobserved family background reduces, but does not eliminate, the estimated consequences of early childbearing. Statistically significant and quantitatively important effects of teen parenthood remain for high school graduation, family size, and economic well-being.
Bibliography Citation
Hoffman, Saul D., E. Michael Foster and Frank F. Jr. Furstenberg. "Reevaluating the Costs of Teenage Childbearing." Demography 30,1 (February 1993): 1-13.
6. Hoffman, Saul D.
Foster, E. Michael
Furstenberg, Frank F. Jr.
Reevaluating the Costs of Teenage Childbearing: Response to Geronimus and Korenman
Demography 30,2 (May 1993): 291-296.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/e17684r567083k0w/
Cohort(s): NLS General, NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing, Adolescent; Data Analysis; Educational Attainment; Family Background; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Evidence suggests that early childbearing, although not as disastrous an event as portrayed in early studies, still often causes harm to already disadvantaged women. In particular, the evidence to date suggests that educational attainment and economic well-being are reduced by a teen birth, even after controlling for the effects of family background. Although the differences between the conventional estimates and fixed-effect estimates are not always statistically significant, sister comparisons suggest that the effects of teen childbearing have been overstated somewhat in the past. None of the replications, however, provide any evidence that the remaining effects of teen childbearing are negligible, as originally suggested. In constrast to other research that uses various technical variations of sampling and data analysis, analysts argue that it is premature to conclude that the true effects of teenage childbearing are quite small.
Bibliography Citation
Hoffman, Saul D., E. Michael Foster and Frank F. Jr. Furstenberg. "Reevaluating the Costs of Teenage Childbearing: Response to Geronimus and Korenman." Demography 30,2 (May 1993): 291-296.