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Author: Fosse, Nathan Edward
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Fosse, Nathan Edward
Haas, Steven A.
Validity and Stability of Self-Reported Health among Adolescents in a Longitudinal, Nationally Representative Survey
Pediatrics 123,3 (March 2009): 496-501.
Also: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/123/3/e496
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Academy of Pediatrics
Keyword(s): Fathers and Sons; Gender; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Mothers and Daughters; Obesity; Pairs (also see Siblings); Self-Reporting; Weight

OBJECTIVES: The goals of this study to assess (1) the stability of self-reported health among a nationally representative sample of youth in adolescence over a period of 6 years, (2) the concordance of self-reported health between parents and children, and (3) the validity of self-reported health across a range of physical and emotional indicators of adolescent well-being.

METHODS: This study uses data from rounds 1 to 7 (1997-2003) of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 Cohort (NLSY97). The sample consists of 6748 youth born between January 1, 1980, and December 31, 1984. Data on one of the youths' parents were also included in the baseline of the survey. Analyses were conducted using polychoric correlations and ordinal logistic regression.

RESULTS: Self-reported health of adolescents over a 7-year period indicated moderate stability (40% agreement after 7 years for girls and 41% for boys). Concordance was also present between parents and their children, although the association was higher among same-gender pairings (mother-daughter and father-son concordances). Adolescents' self-reported health was also linked with the presence or absence of chronic health conditions, emotional problems, and with being overweight or obese but not with sensory conditions or physical deformity.

CONCLUSIONS: Self-reported health is stable from early and middle adolescence to young adulthood. Self-reported health is also a valid measure of a variety of physical and emotional dimensions of adolescent well-being. The stability and validity of self-reported health do not differ by the gender of the child, although there is slightly greater concordance when the reporting parent is the same gender as the child.

Bibliography Citation
Fosse, Nathan Edward and Steven A. Haas. "Validity and Stability of Self-Reported Health among Adolescents in a Longitudinal, Nationally Representative Survey." Pediatrics 123,3 (March 2009): 496-501.
2. Haas, Steven A.
Fosse, Nathan Edward
Health and the Educational Attainment of Adolescents: Evidence from the NLSY97
CePoD Working Paper # 07-104, Center for Population Dynamics, School of Social and Family Dynamics Arizona State University, March 2007.
Also: http://www.asu.edu/clas/ssfd/cepod/working/CePoD_WP_2007_104.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Center for Population Dynamics, School of Social and Family Dynamics, Arizona State University
Keyword(s): Academic Development; Achievement; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; High School Diploma; Modeling, Logit; Schooling, Post-secondary

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the mechanisms linking health to the educational attainment of adolescents. In particular, it investigates the role of cognitive/academic achievement and a variety of psychosocial adjustment factors in explaining this relationship. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort (NLSY97) we estimate models of timely high school completion and post-secondary enrollment using both standard logit estimation and sibling fixed-effects models. We find that net of sociodemographic background and stable unobserved family characteristics, adolescents who experience worse health are substantially less likely to complete high school by their 20th birthday and to subsequently transition to post-secondary education. Cognitive/academic achievement and psychosocial factors appear to explain a large portion of these health-related educational deficits. However, adolescent health continues to be significantly associated with these important educational transitions. The findings highlight a potentially important role of health selection processes in generating socioeconomic inequalities in early adolescence to young adulthood.
Bibliography Citation
Haas, Steven A. and Nathan Edward Fosse. "Health and the Educational Attainment of Adolescents: Evidence from the NLSY97." CePoD Working Paper # 07-104, Center for Population Dynamics, School of Social and Family Dynamics Arizona State University, March 2007.
3. Haas, Steven A.
Fosse, Nathan Edward
Health and the Educational Attainment of Adolescents: Evidence from the NLSY97
Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2006.
Also: http://www.allacademic.com//meta/p_mla_apa_research_citation/1/0/3/0/1/pages103013/p103013-2.php
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Bullying/Victimization; College Enrollment; Education, Secondary; Educational Attainment; Family Characteristics; Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; High School Completion/Graduates; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Siblings; Socioeconomic Factors

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A small but growing body of research suggests a potentially important role of early life health in shaping educational and socioeconomic attainments in adulthood. In most respects these findings are consistent with a large and long standing literature documenting the deleterious long-term developmental outcomes of low birth weight and poor infant/child health. However, very little is known about the factors linking poor childhood health and educational outcomes. This study addresses this gap by investigating the cognitive and social mechanisms by which poor health may influence the educational outcomes of adolescents. Preliminary results confirm the previously found association between childhood health and educational attainment. Healthy adolescents spend more time studying, and have higher grade point averages. Healthy adolescents also obtain higher scores on the Math PIAT test. Adolescents who report poorer health are significantly more likely to be the victims of bullying and are more likely to be involved in physical altercations. The results provide some of the first longitudinal analyses confirming what previous researchers have largely speculated: health influences academic attainment in adolescence, and it does so by influencing students' performance and their social connections in school. In addition, we will expand this research by more explicitly focusing on the latter mechanism, that is, how health in adolescent influences their social participation in school.
Bibliography Citation
Haas, Steven A. and Nathan Edward Fosse. "Health and the Educational Attainment of Adolescents: Evidence from the NLSY97." Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2006.
4. Haas, Steven A.
Fosse, Nathan Edward
Health and the Educational Attainment of Adolescents: Evidence from the NLSY97
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 49,2 (June 2008): 178-192.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/49/2/178.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Academic Development; Accidents; Bullying/Victimization; Cognitive Development; Educational Attainment; Family Characteristics; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; High School Completion/Graduates; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Modeling, Logit; Psychological Effects; Schooling, Post-secondary; Siblings; Socioeconomic Factors; Teenagers; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article examines the mechanisms linking health to the educational attainment of adolescents. In particular, it investigates the role of cognitive/academic achievement and a variety of psychosocial adjustment factors in explaining this relationship. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort (NLSY97), we estimate models of timely high school completion and of post-secondary enrollment using both standard logit estimation and sibling fixed-effects models. We find that, net of sociodemographic background and stable unobserved family characteristics, adolescents who experience worse health are substantially less likely to complete high school by their 20th birthday and to transition to post-secondary education. Cognitive/academic achievement and psychosocial factors appear to explain a large portion of these health-related educational deficits. However, adolescent health continues to be significantly associated with these key educational transitions. The findings highlight a potentially important role of health selection processes in generating socioeconomic inequalities in early adolescence to young adulthood. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Haas, Steven A. and Nathan Edward Fosse. "Health and the Educational Attainment of Adolescents: Evidence from the NLSY97." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 49,2 (June 2008): 178-192.