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Author: Deza, Monica
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Chalfin, Aaron
Deza, Monica
The Intergenerational Effects of Education on Delinquency
Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization published online (25 August 2017): DOI: doi.org/10.1016/j.jebo.2017.07.034.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167268117302123
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Educational Attainment; Geocoded Data; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Parental Influences; State-Level Data/Policy

Children of less educated parents are more likely to engage in delinquent behavior. One explanation for this is that better educated parents are inherently more likely to raise children in ways that are less conducive to criminal participation. Alternatively, additional parental education may change parents' behavior in ways that reduces their children's propensity to commit crime. Using data from the NLSY79 and variation induced by changes in compulsory schooling laws in the United States, we find that an increase in parental education reduces delinquent behavior among the children of those exposed to compulsory schooling laws. This research is the first to uncover evidence of an intergenerational effect of education on crime in the United States. We conclude that previous analyses of compulsory schooling laws − and investments in education more generally − appreciably underestimate the full benefits of investments in education.
Bibliography Citation
Chalfin, Aaron and Monica Deza. "The Intergenerational Effects of Education on Delinquency." Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization published online (25 August 2017): DOI: doi.org/10.1016/j.jebo.2017.07.034.
2. Deza, Monica
Is There a Stepping Stone Effect in Drug Use? Separating State Dependence from Unobserved Heterogeneity Within and Between Illicit Drugs
Journal of Econometrics 184,1 (January 2015): 193-207.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S030440761400181X
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Drug Use; Geocoded Data; Heterogeneity; Modeling; Substance Use

Empirically, teenagers who use soft drugs are more likely to use hard drugs in the future. This pattern can be explained by a causal effect (i.e., state dependence between drugs or stepping-stone effects) or by unobserved characteristics that make people more likely to use both soft and hard drugs (i.e., correlated unobserved heterogeneity). I estimate a dynamic discrete choice model of alcohol, marijuana and hard drug use over multiple years, and separately identify the contributions of state dependence (within and between drugs) and unobserved heterogeneity. I find statistically significant "stepping-stone" effects from softer to harder drugs, and conclude that alcohol, marijuana and hard drugs are complements in utility.
Bibliography Citation
Deza, Monica. "Is There a Stepping Stone Effect in Drug Use? Separating State Dependence from Unobserved Heterogeneity Within and Between Illicit Drugs." Journal of Econometrics 184,1 (January 2015): 193-207.
3. Deza, Monica
The Effects of Alcohol on the Consumption of Hard Drugs: Regression Discontinuity Evidence from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth, 1997
Health Economics 24,4 (April 2015): 419-438.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/hec.3027/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Drug Use; Substance Use; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper estimates the effect of alcohol use on consumption of hard drugs using the exogenous decrease in the cost of accessing alcohol that occurs when individuals reach the minimum legal drinking age. By using a regression discontinuity design and the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1997, I find that all measures of alcohol consumption, even alcohol initiation increase discontinuously at age 21 years. I also find evidence that consumption of hard drugs decreased by 1.5 to 2 percentage points and the probability of initiating the use of hard drugs decreased by 1 percentage point at the age of 21 years, while the intensity of use among users remained unchanged. These estimates are robust to a variety of specifications and also remain robust across different subsamples. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Bibliography Citation
Deza, Monica. "The Effects of Alcohol on the Consumption of Hard Drugs: Regression Discontinuity Evidence from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth, 1997." Health Economics 24,4 (April 2015): 419-438.