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Author: Debeaumont, Ronald
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Debeaumont, Ronald
Occupational Differences in the Wage Penalty for Obese Women
Journal of Socio-Economics 38,2 (March 2009): 344-349.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053535708001819#sec3
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Discrimination, Body weight; Obesity; Occupations; Self-Employed Workers; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty; Wages, Women

Prior research indicates overweight women are penalized with lower wages. The connection between weight and wages is tested for several occupational categories. The results suggest weight significantly reduces pay only for women in sales and service occupations, a finding consistent with customer discrimination. Obese females who are self-employed also receive a significant wage penalty in customer-oriented occupations, suggesting the pay discrepancy is not originating from employer discrimination.
Bibliography Citation
Debeaumont, Ronald. "Occupational Differences in the Wage Penalty for Obese Women." Journal of Socio-Economics 38,2 (March 2009): 344-349.
2. Debeaumont, Ronald
Nsiah, Christian
Do Unions Reduce the Wage Penalty Experienced by Obese Women?
Economics Bulletin 36,1 (2016): 281-290.
Also: http://econpapers.repec.org/article/eblecbull/eb-14-00865.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Economics Bulletin
Keyword(s): Collective Bargaining; Obesity; Unions; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Unions have been shown to reduce wage inequality, thus resulting in higher wages for certain disadvantaged groups. Overweight individuals, especially women, generally receive lower wages than thinner individuals with similar socioeconomic characteristics. This paper demonstrates that union wage protection extends to overweight women in the U.S. Specifically, obese women do not experience a wage penalty when employed in jobs covered by collective bargaining.
Bibliography Citation
Debeaumont, Ronald and Christian Nsiah. "Do Unions Reduce the Wage Penalty Experienced by Obese Women?" Economics Bulletin 36,1 (2016): 281-290.
3. Debeaumont, Ronald
Nsiah, Christian
Unemployment and Compensating Wages: An Analysis of Shift Work
Journal of Economics and Finance 34,2 (April 2010): 142-149
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/420208h88t521747/
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Labor Market Segmentation; Shift Workers; Unemployment; Wage Determination; Wage Differentials; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Compensating wages have been documented for a number of job attributes including working non-standard hours. Using data that aggregates across occupations, our analysis confirms a wage premium for working night shifts. However, the compensating wage is greater in areas where unemployment is low, suggesting that employers are less pressured to compensate for night shifts when employment opportunities are relatively scarce. If this result holds for other undesirable work characteristics, such as risk of death on the job, then weak labor markets will have lower compensating wages in general. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Debeaumont, Ronald and Christian Nsiah. "Unemployment and Compensating Wages: An Analysis of Shift Work ." Journal of Economics and Finance 34,2 (April 2010): 142-149.
4. Nsiah, Christian
DeBeaumont, Ronald
Ryerson, Annette
Motherhood and Earnings: Wage Variability by Major Occupational Category and Earnings Level
Journal of Family and Economic Issues 34,2 (June 2013): 224-234.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10834-012-9323-2
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Earnings; Maternal Employment; Motherhood; Occupations; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Prior research has indicated that women with children earn less than their childless counterparts. In addition, recent research has found that the motherhood wage penalty may be most severe for low-income earners. Using panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979), we test two hypotheses. First, are there occupational differences in the motherhood wage penalty? Second, are there occupational differences in the relative wage penalty experienced by low and high wage mothers? Our results indicated that mothers in sales occupations are penalized at a significantly higher rate than mothers in non-sales occupations, while mothers in blue-collar occupations were penalized the least. Furthermore, the wage cost of motherhood was greatest amongst the highest earners in sales occupations.
Bibliography Citation
Nsiah, Christian, Ronald DeBeaumont and Annette Ryerson. "Motherhood and Earnings: Wage Variability by Major Occupational Category and Earnings Level." Journal of Family and Economic Issues 34,2 (June 2013): 224-234.