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Author: Datta, Atreyee Rupa
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Abe, Yasuyo
Betesh, Hannah
Datta, Atreyee Rupa
A Longitudinal Analysis of Early Self-employment in the NLSYs
Small Business Administration Research Summary 367, August 2010.
Also: http://www.sba.gov/advo/research/rs367.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Small Business Administration
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Entrepreneurship; Family Background; Family Characteristics; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Self-Employed Workers; Small Business (Owner/Employer); Work Histories

While the existing literature on self-employment offers a wealth of information on the characteristics of self-employed workers at a single point in time, to date few studies have taken workers' patterns of self-employment as their unit of analysis. Few studies describe how involvement in self-employment is changing for the new generation of workers. The purpose of this research is to provide policy-relevant analysis of the characteristics and career paths of those Americans who have chosen self-employment. Specifically, this study will (a) provide new empirical findings regarding the dynamics of self-employment that underpin individual entrepreneurship during early adult work life; and (b) document generational changes in self-employment patterns in early adult work life between two cohorts born in the second half of the 20th century.To address these research issues, this study utilizes two National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth, the 1979 Cohort (NLSY79) and the 1997 Cohort (NLSY97), which offer extensive information on economic activity, as well as data on personal and family backgrounds, and allow detailed longitudinal investigation of self-employment activities.
Bibliography Citation
Abe, Yasuyo, Hannah Betesh and Atreyee Rupa Datta. "A Longitudinal Analysis of Early Self-employment in the NLSYs." Small Business Administration Research Summary 367, August 2010.
2. Datta, Atreyee Rupa
Composition Effects in Labor Markets and Families: Two Essays
Ph.D. Dissertation, The University of Chicago, 2001. DAI, 62, no. 02A (2001): 784
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Educational Attainment; Family Studies; Fathers, Presence; High School Diploma; Labor Market Demographics; Labor Market Outcomes; Poverty; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Tests and Testing; Welfare

This dissertation comprises two essays. The first essay investigates the effects of improved local educational attainment on the labor market outcomes of less-educated workers. A simple model of a local labor market production function formalizes the hypothesis that more-educated workers improve the productivity of less-educated workers through on-the-job training and other informal interactions. Instrumental variables estimates using 1980 and 1990 U.S. Census data for 288 Metropolitan Statistical Areas indicate that adults without high school diplomas experience declines in labor market outcomes in response to an exogenous increase in the local supply of college-graduate labor. Male workers suffer both wage and hours deterioration, while women maintain earnings levels by compensating for lower wages through increased employment. The findings suggest that policies that target local educational attainment to achieve economic growth may hurt less-educated workers, increasing rather than abating poverty, welfare needs, and other related social phenomena.

The second essay asks whether the effect of father presence varies by maternal age in two adolescent outcomes, math achievement scores and early cigarette smoking. The increased incidence of first births among women age 30 or over suggests study of this population as researchers have investigated births to younger women. Positive effects of father presence are found for a range of child and adolescent outcomes among children at all birth timings, but theories of parenting and empirical differences in older and younger mothers suggest that the father presence effect may vary by maternal age. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 Cohort, I find that the effect of father presence increases with maternal age for both math achievement and deferred smoking. The change is attributable to observable parental characteristics that are correlated with maternal age rather than a pure effect of maternal age.

Bibliography Citation
Datta, Atreyee Rupa. Composition Effects in Labor Markets and Families: Two Essays. Ph.D. Dissertation, The University of Chicago, 2001. DAI, 62, no. 02A (2001): 784.
3. Datta, Atreyee Rupa
Travel Time to Child Care Settings--Evidence from the NLSY97
Presented: Albuquerque NM, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM)
Keyword(s): Child Care

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper looks at data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 Cohort, which has collected data on travel time to regular child care arrangements every three years for the children of a nationally representative sample of adults born 1980 to 1984. Using these data, we will report travel times by parent characteristics, type of care, and characteristics of the location of residence. In addition, we will compare out of pocket costs for care with the imputed costs of travel time based on parents' hourly rates of compensation. These data will help illuminate families' access to different types of child care and the contribution of travel costs to total costs paid by parents for their children's care, thus making an ongoing contribution to the discussion of differential access to early care and education.
Bibliography Citation
Datta, Atreyee Rupa. "Travel Time to Child Care Settings--Evidence from the NLSY97." Presented: Albuquerque NM, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 2014.
4. Datta, Atreyee Rupa
Horrigan, Michael W.
Walker, James R.
Evaluation of a Monetary Incentive Payment Experiment in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 Cohort
Presented: Arlington, VA, Federal Committee on Statistcal Methodology Conference, November 14-16, 2001.
Also: http://www.fcsm.gov/01papers/Horrigan.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology (FCSM)
Keyword(s): Interviewing Method; Longitudinal Surveys

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The evidence on incentives in survey literature shows that the effectiveness of incentives varies considerably with the topic of the survey, the nature of the respondent, the amount of the incentive, the survey sponsorship, and the form and timing of the payment. (See, for instance, Council of Professional Associations on Federal Statistics, September 1993; Ezzait-Rice, White, Mosher and Sanchez, 1995; Kulka 1995; Groves and Couper, 1998 [chapter 10]; Singer, Van Hoewyrk, Gebler, Raghunathan and McGonagle, 1999; and Singer, 2000.) The literature, however, is sparse on the special case of panel surveys, although anecdotal evidence is available—especially on the effect of unchanging incentive payment levels over several years as has been the case in the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS) Program. We contribute to the literature on the effect of incentive fees in panel surveys by providing preliminary analysis of results from an incentive fee experiment conducted in the fourth round of interviews (conducted between November 2000 and June 2001) of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 Cohort (NLSY97).

Respondents of the NLSY97 were born in the years 1980-84 and were 16 to 20 years old in the fourth round of annual interviews. Although the response rates for the first three rounds of interviewing were above 90 percent, the response rate for Round 3 was slightly lower than that of Round 2. The payment incentive during the first three rounds was constant at $10 and was paid by the field interviewer at the completion of the interview. Concerned over the decline in responses rates and its implication for future rounds, the sponsor of the study, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), applied for and received approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to conduct an experiment manipulating the timing of payment and the level of respondent fee paid. The interviews for the NLSY97 are conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) of the University of Chicago under contract to the BLS. The experiment had two treatments: (1) payment of the fee prior to scheduling the in-person interview; and (2) increases in respondent fees.

Bibliography Citation
Datta, Atreyee Rupa, Michael W. Horrigan and James R. Walker. "Evaluation of a Monetary Incentive Payment Experiment in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 Cohort." Presented: Arlington, VA, Federal Committee on Statistcal Methodology Conference, November 14-16, 2001.
5. Datta, Atreyee Rupa
Krishnamurty, Parvati
High School Experience: Comparing Self-Report and Transcript Data from the NLSY97
Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
Also: http://harrisschool.uchicago.edu/Research/conferences/NLSYConf/pdf/DattaKrishnamurty_NLSY97Transcript_052408.doc
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Data Quality/Consistency; Education, Secondary; High School Students; High School Transcripts; Interviewing Method; Self-Reporting

The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 Cohort (NLSY97) dataset include two sources of information about respondents' high school experiences: self-reports from annual interviews with individuals throughout their high school years, and abstracted information from their high school transcripts. Although the transcripts and interview data were designed to complement one another, their co-existence offers the opportunity to compare interview and transcript data as alternative sources for some key pieces of data about educational experience. In this paper, we describe the two types of data collected from these sources and assess the concordance of some measures. We conclude with some comments about the relative merits and weaknesses of each type of data for measuring different aspects of high school experience.
Bibliography Citation
Datta, Atreyee Rupa and Parvati Krishnamurty. "High School Experience: Comparing Self-Report and Transcript Data from the NLSY97." Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
6. Pierret, Charles R.
Datta, Atreyee Rupa
50 Years of American Indebtedness and Policies That Have Shaped It
Presented: Miami FL, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 12-14, 2015
Cohort(s): Mature Women, NLSY79, NLSY97, Older Men, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM)
Keyword(s): Credit/Credit Constraint; Debt/Borrowing; Financial Assistance; Legislation; Life Course; State-Level Data/Policy

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using all six surveys in the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS) program, this paper documents patterns of household debt since the late 1960s across several generations born throughout the 20th century. The paper indicates the extent to which demographic disparities in debt (for example, across age, educational attainment and race/ethnicity) have varied over time or across the life course. In tandem, the paper identifies key policy or market changes that have affected household indebtedness over the same 50 year period. Relevant areas include federal income tax treatment of mortgage debt, regulation of housing finance more generally, the rise of unsecured credit through credit cards, available methods of college finance, divorce laws, and federal and state tax incentives for retirement savings.
Bibliography Citation
Pierret, Charles R. and Atreyee Rupa Datta. "50 Years of American Indebtedness and Policies That Have Shaped It." Presented: Miami FL, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 12-14, 2015.