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Author: Conger, Rand D.
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Reeder, Amy L.
Conger, Rand D.
Differential Mother and Father Influences on the Educational Attainment of Black and White Women
Sociological Quarterly 25,2 (Spring 1984): 239-250.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1533-8525.1984.tb00185.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: University of California Press
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Fathers, Influence; Parental Influences; Racial Differences

This paper examines the effects of maternal and parental education, occupation, and encouragement on the educational attainment of women, and whether these influences operate similarly for blacks and whites. Data from the NLS of Young Women are used to examine the situations of 428 white and 145 black females. Findings indicate different patterns in the way mothers and fathers affect their daughters' educational attainments.For both groups of women, father's education was more important than that of the mother, but mother's occupation was more important than that of the father. Mother's occupation and parental expectation variables were important for black women, while parental education variables were more important for white women.
Bibliography Citation
Reeder, Amy L. and Rand D. Conger. "Differential Mother and Father Influences on the Educational Attainment of Black and White Women." Sociological Quarterly 25,2 (Spring 1984): 239-250.
2. Reeder, Amy L.
Conger, Rand D.
Educational Attainment of Women: Socialization and Allocation Processes
Presented: Knoxville, TN, Annual Meeting of the Southern Sociological Society, 1980
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Southern Sociological Society
Keyword(s): Assets; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; Family Background and Culture; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers and Daughters; Parental Influences; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In order to test the hypothesis that mothers have a greater impact on the educational success of their daughters than do fathers, data are analyzed for 428 white and 145 black women. Parent's social background characteristics and encouragement for further education were measured in 1968 and 1971. The young women, aged 14 through 17 years in 1968, were asked what their educational goals were in 1971 and the actual years of schooling they completed was obtained in 1975. Throughout the analysis, mother's occupation is especially salient for the attainments of daughters; however, the findings for the special sex-of-parent effect are mixed. As expected, the limited socialization model employed here operated differently for black women who were less able to convert their parent's social position into assets for their own status attainment. In addition, the effects of the mother are consistently stronger for black than for white women. Implications of the findings for current theory and for future research are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Reeder, Amy L. and Rand D. Conger. "Educational Attainment of Women: Socialization and Allocation Processes." Presented: Knoxville, TN, Annual Meeting of the Southern Sociological Society, 1980.