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Author: Comeau, Jinette
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Comeau, Jinette
Avison, William R.
Willson, Andrea E.
Economic Resources and Trajectories of Children's Mental Health over the Early Life Course
Presented: Chicago IL, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2015
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Anxiety; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Mental Health; Depression (see also CESD); Family Income; Income Level; Life Course

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although the timing, duration, and sequencing of economic disadvantage are relevant to the experience of poverty and children's mental health, to date, few studies consider these temporal patterns simultaneously. This study uses data from the Child Supplement of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (n=2,680) to assess the extent to which stability and change in family income is associated with children's trajectories of depression/anxiety and antisocial behavior from age 4 to 14. We empirically construct 6 income categories that represent children with comparable profiles of economic resources over time: increasing, decreasing, fluctuating, and stability across low-, medium-, and high-income families. Incorporating these income categories in multiple group latent growth curve models provides an important opportunity to understand how they initiate and shape children's mental health trajectories. Results reveal significant disparities in antisocial behavior and depression/anxiety at age 4 and over time across the income categories, with the most pronounced difference occurring between children in the persistently low- and high-income categories. In addition, whereas children exposed to persistently low and medium levels of income demonstrate a modest increase in antisocial behavior in early adolescence, children with persistently high levels of income exhibit a steady decline in problem behaviors across the early life course.
Bibliography Citation
Comeau, Jinette, William R. Avison and Andrea E. Willson. "Economic Resources and Trajectories of Children's Mental Health over the Early Life Course." Presented: Chicago IL, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2015.
2. Comeau, Jinette
Boyle, Michael
Maternal Emotional Support and Children's Trajectories of Depression and Anxiety: Moderation by Economic Context
Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Anxiety; Child Health; Depression (see also CESD); Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Poverty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the Child Supplement of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N=7,354), this paper examines the relative impact of stability and change in children's exposure to poverty from age 4 to 14 on trajectories of maternal emotional support, and the extent to which these dynamic experiences of poverty moderate the association between maternal emotional support and children's trajectories of depression and anxiety. Whereas children who are always poor are exposed to the lowest levels of emotional support at age 4 and over time, relief from poverty is associated with an increase in emotional support. Over time, the association between emotional support and children's depression and anxiety is non-linear, with children who are always poor or who move into poverty deriving more benefits than their counterparts who are never poor.
Bibliography Citation
Comeau, Jinette and Michael Boyle. "Maternal Emotional Support and Children's Trajectories of Depression and Anxiety: Moderation by Economic Context." Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016.
3. Comeau, Jinette
Boyle, Michael H.
Patterns of Poverty Exposure and Children's Trajectories of Externalizing and Internalizing Behaviors
SSM - Population Health 4 (April 2018): 86-94.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352827317301489
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Family Income; Health, Mental; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Mothers, Education; Parents, Single; Poverty

Using data from the Child Supplement of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we compare trajectories of externalizing and internalizing behaviors among children exposed to five patterns of poverty from birth to age 14: always or never poor -- stable patterns; a single transition into or out of poverty, or repeated fluctuations in and out of poverty -- changing patterns. We also examine how low maternal education and single parenthood interact with these poverty exposures to compound their adverse effects. Finally, we compare the magnitude of effects associated with the patterns of poverty exposure, as well as their interactions with low maternal education and single parenthood, on trajectories of externalizing and internalizing behaviors to determine if they are significantly different. Results reveal that initial levels and rates of change in children's trajectories of externalizing and internalizing behaviors are similar across the three changing patterns of poverty exposure, leading us to combine them into a single group representing intermittent poverty. Initial disparities between children who are never poor and their counterparts who are always or intermittently poor are constant over time for internalizing behaviors and grow in magnitude for externalizing behaviors. The cumulative negative effect of poverty exposure over time is stronger for externalizing vs. internalizing behaviors. Low maternal education compounds the adverse effects of persistent poverty, an effect that is similar for externalizing and internalizing behaviors.
Bibliography Citation
Comeau, Jinette and Michael H. Boyle. "Patterns of Poverty Exposure and Children's Trajectories of Externalizing and Internalizing Behaviors." SSM - Population Health 4 (April 2018): 86-94.