Search Results

Author: Carr, Rhoda Viellion
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Carr, Rhoda Viellion
Effects of Teenage Work Experience Over Ten Years: Evidence From the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Ph.D. Dissertation, Tulane University, 1995
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Drug Use; Education, Secondary; Educational Attainment; Employment; Family Formation; Family Studies; Income; Labor Force Participation; Work Experience

This dissertation reports findings from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) concerning the effects of working during the teen years on educational attainment, labor force participation, income, family formation, and alcohol and drug use at age 22 and age 26. The sample includes all those in the 1962-1964 birth cohorts. Results from my analysis of long-term effects suggest moderately negative effects on educational attainment-- working youth are less likely to attend college or to complete four or more years of college. However, working during high school has a positive effect on a variety of labor force outcomes (labor force participation, employment status, and income) at age 22 and age 26, despite the small educational decrement that working youth suffer. Those with more work experience during their teens marry earlier, and are somewhat more likely to use alcohol and marijuana. The study concludes that, by the early to mid-twenties, the labor force and income gains somewhat offset the educational decrements that result from working while in high school.
Bibliography Citation
Carr, Rhoda Viellion. Effects of Teenage Work Experience Over Ten Years: Evidence From the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Ph.D. Dissertation, Tulane University, 1995.
2. Carr, Rhoda Viellion
Wright, James D.
Brody, Charles J.
Effects of High School Work Experience a Decade Later: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey
Sociology of Education 69,1 (January 1996): 66-81.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2112724
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): College Graduates; Educational Attainment; Employment, In-School; Employment, Youth; High School Completion/Graduates; Income Level; Job Status; Labor Force Participation; Labor Market Outcomes; Unions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Reports data from the 1979-1991 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth for a sample of 2,716 young people (ages 16-19 when first surveyed) on the effects of working while in high school on educational attainments & a variety of labor force outcomes roughly a decade after high school completion. Previous studies focused on short-term consequences & reported mixed & contradictory results. Here, results suggest moderately negative long-term effects on educational attainment in that working youths are less likely to attend or to complete 4+ years of college. However, working during high school has a positive effect on a variety of labor force outcomes (labor force participation, employment status, & income) even a decade later, despite the small educational decrement that working youths suffer. It is concluded that, a decade later, labor force & income gains somewhat offset the educational decrements that are related to working while in high school. 5 Tables, 21 References. Adap ted from the source document. (Copyright 1996, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Carr, Rhoda Viellion, James D. Wright and Charles J. Brody. "Effects of High School Work Experience a Decade Later: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey." Sociology of Education 69,1 (January 1996): 66-81.
3. Wright, James D.
Carr, Rhoda Viellion
Effects of High School Work Experience a Decade Later: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey
Washington DC: Employment Policies Institute, September 1995
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Employment Policies Institute
Keyword(s): Families, Two-Parent; Family Background; Family Income; High School; High School Completion/Graduates; Labor Force Participation; Part-Time Work; Teenagers; Unemployment Rate; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using a data sample from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth that included all youths enrolled in high school who were aged 16-19 in 1979, a study tracked the youths' labor force attachment and earnings 12 years later. The study found that students who worked while in high school show increased rates of labor force participation along with lower rates of unemployment 12 years later. At the later date, of those with the heaviest work schedules while in school, 87 percent were employed and only 4 percent were unemployed (the rest were not in the labor force). Those with moderate work hours while in school had an 81 percent employment rate and 5 percent unemployment rate 12 years later, whereas of those with no work hours while in school 72 percent were employed and 7 percent were unemployed. In addition, those who had the heaviest work schedules while in high school had the highest earnings in the later study---attributable to more hours worked per year. The study also found that the teens who were most likely to work had higher family incomes, better-educated parents, and more often, two working parents in the home. When differences in family background were accounted for, the only potentially negative effect of in-school work is that those who worked, especially those who worked the most hours, tended to complete about 12 weeks less total education than did students who did not work while in school. The study concluded that the measured reduction in adult unemployment rates of those teens who worked speaks to the importance and value of the work they carried out. Their reduced unemployment rates, greater labor force attachment, and earnings gains all took place despite the fact that the typical employment opportunities were found in the service and retail sectors, jobs often maligned in discussions of the current economy. (Contains 22 references.) (KC)
Bibliography Citation
Wright, James D. and Rhoda Viellion Carr. Effects of High School Work Experience a Decade Later: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey. Washington DC: Employment Policies Institute, September 1995.