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Author: Carliner, Geoffrey
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Carliner, Geoffrey
Measurement Error and the Estimation of Labor Supply Functions from Panel Data
Mimeo, University of Western Ontario, 1988
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: unknown
Keyword(s): Family Income; Husbands, Income; Wives, Income

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A model in which the household's utility depends on the level of the composite good produced in each period with inputs of husband's and wife's home time and market goods is developed. Given the full wealth budget constraint, two wage elasticities are derived. The elasticity of an individual's labor supply with respect to a one period change in his own wage includes substitution in consumption across periods, substitution of his home time for other inputs to household production within the period, and a small wealth effect. The labor supply elasticity with respect to a permanent change in the wage in all periods includes only within period substitution and a large wealth effect. Thus the temporary elasticity is predicted to be more positive than the permanent wage elasticity, and presumably larger than zero.
Bibliography Citation
Carliner, Geoffrey. "Measurement Error and the Estimation of Labor Supply Functions from Panel Data." Mimeo, University of Western Ontario, 1988.
2. Carliner, Geoffrey
Permanent and Transitory Wage Effects in a Multi-Period Family Labor Supply Model
Working Paper, Department of Economics, University of Western Ontario, London ON, 1980
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Department of Economics, University of Western Ontario
Keyword(s): Dual-Career Families; Earnings, Wives; Family Income; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Labor Supply; Wages; Wives, Work

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using a subset of 680 married white men, this paper develops a model in which the household's utility depends on the level of the composite goods produced in each period with inputs of husband's and wife's home time and market goods. Given the full wealth budget constraint, two wage elasticities are derived. The elasticity of an individual's labor supply with respect to a one period change in his own wage includes substitution in consumption across periods, substitution of his home time for other inputs to household production within the period, and small wealth effect. The labor supply elasticity with respect to a permanent change in the wage in all periods includes only within period substitution and a large wealth effect. Thus the temporary elasticity is predicted to be more positive that the permanent wage elasticity, and presumably larger than zero. The other findings of this paper are a significantly negative permanent cross wage elasticity of wife's wage on husband's weekly hours, but small and insignificant effects on other measures of husband's labor supply. Health, age, and education affect labor supply directly, as well as indirectly through their effect on wage rates. Finally, persistent differences among individuals account for over one fifth of the unexplained variance in the log of weekly hours, while temporary fluctuations or measurement error account for the remaining four fifths.
Bibliography Citation
Carliner, Geoffrey. "Permanent and Transitory Wage Effects in a Multi-Period Family Labor Supply Model." Working Paper, Department of Economics, University of Western Ontario, London ON, 1980.
3. Carliner, Geoffrey
Social Security and the Labor Supply of Older Men
Final Report, Employment and Training Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, 1980
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Earnings; Part-Time Work; Pensions; Retirement; Social Security

The Social Security earnings test currently reduces benefits by fifty cents for each dollar earned above a certain exempt amount. Increasing the exempt amount or eliminating the earnings test altogether might: (1) encourage men who retire completely under current rules to work part time; (2) encourage pensioners who currently work part time to work more hours; and (3) encourage workers who currently receive no benefits even though they are eligible to become pensioners and work fewer hours. Regression results using data from the NLS of Older Men suggest retirement behavior. The estimated effects of wage rates and benefit levels also suggest that eliminating the earnings test will not increase labor supply but will increase the net cost to the government of Social Security pensions.
Bibliography Citation
Carliner, Geoffrey. "Social Security and the Labor Supply of Older Men." Final Report, Employment and Training Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, 1980.
4. Carliner, Geoffrey
The Wages of Older Men
Journal of Human Resources 17,1 (Winter 1982): 25-38.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/145522
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Discrimination; Discrimination, Age; Educational Attainment; Health Factors; Job Patterns; Retirement; Wage Levels; Wages, Men

Net depreciation rates in human capital are estimated from wage data on a longitudinal sample of Older Men aged 45-64. The results indicate that wage rates begin to decline in the early fifties at rates under one percent annually and decline at about two percent annually after age 60. This decrease was offset by the general increase in wage levels so that on average the real wages of men approaching retirement did not decline during the period studied. The general increase was larger for blacks than for whites, probably because of decreases in labor market discrimination between 1966 and 1974. An appendix presents a GLS estimator for a variance components model in which the number of observations per individual varies.
Bibliography Citation
Carliner, Geoffrey. "The Wages of Older Men." Journal of Human Resources 17,1 (Winter 1982): 25-38.