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Author: Burton, Russell P. D.
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Burton, Russell P. D.
Rushing, Beth
Ritter, Christian
Rakocy, Andrea
Roles, Race and Subjective Well-Being: A Longitudinal Analysis of Elderly Men
Social Indicators Research 28,2 (February 1993): 137-156
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Racial Differences; Social Roles; Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Examined the impact of race and social roles on subjective well-being in elderly men, using data from the older male cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience. Data from interviews with 2,285 men (aged 55-69 yrs at Time 1 and 60-74 yrs at Time 2) were analyzed. Contrary to expectations, results did not indicate lower subjective well-being for Black men than for White men. Findings demonstrate that particular role configurations affect happiness and that these effects are different for Blacks and for Whites. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1993 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Burton, Russell P. D., Beth Rushing, Christian Ritter and Andrea Rakocy. "Roles, Race and Subjective Well-Being: A Longitudinal Analysis of Elderly Men." Social Indicators Research 28,2 (February 1993): 137-156.
2. Rushing, Beth
Ritter, Christian
Burton, Russell P. D.
Race Differences in the Effects of Multiple Roles on Health: Longitudinal Evidence from a National Sample of Older Men
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 33,2 (June 1992): 126-139.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2137251
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Employment; Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Marriage; Mortality; Racial Differences; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines race differences in the effects of social roles on physical health. Using data from the older men cohort of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience, we examine the impact of employment, marriage, and being a supporter on health limitations and mortality. Employment has the most consistent health-protective effect, and the benefits of employment are more pronounced for Blacks than for Whites. Marriage affects health in conjunction with employment. These findings lend further support to the growing literature on the effects of roles on health. The results further illustrate the importance of ascribed statuses as structural determinants of the relationship between roles and health, highlighting the very real differences in the meanings and expectations of social roles for Blacks and Whites.
Bibliography Citation
Rushing, Beth, Christian Ritter and Russell P. D. Burton. "Race Differences in the Effects of Multiple Roles on Health: Longitudinal Evidence from a National Sample of Older Men." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 33,2 (June 1992): 126-139.